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I am saving a screenshot of current image on the computer:

Rectangle bounds = Screen.GetBounds(Point.Empty);

using (var bitmap = new Bitmap(bounds.Width, bounds.Height))
{
    using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap))
    {
       g.CopyFromScreen(Point.Empty, Point.Empty, bounds.Size);
    }

    using (var mss = new MemoryStream())
    {
        bitmap.Save(mss,ImageFormat.Gif);
    }
}

And the memoryleak is at this code:

bitmap.Save(mss,ImageFormat.Gif);

Shouldn't my use of using dispose everything I am using?

Why am I still getting really high memory usage when taking lots of pictures and the memory ain't released back?

Thank you!

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The root question is: why do you need to store a bitmap into a MemoryStream? –  Simon Mourier Jun 20 '11 at 21:11
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You could try to use the BufferManager, it will manage Byte[] for you.

        // declare the BufferManager somewhere. Check thread safety!
        BufferManager bm = BufferManager.CreateBufferManager(qqq, yyy);


        // wrap your current code to use the buffer manager
        Rectangle bounds = Screen.GetBounds(Point.Empty);

        using (var bitmap = new Bitmap(bounds.Width, bounds.Height))
        {
            using (Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap))
            {
                g.CopyFromScreen(Point.Empty, Point.Empty, bounds.Size);
            }

            byte[] buffer = bm.TakeBuffer(yyy);
            try
            {
              using (MemoryStream stream = new MemoryStream(buffer))
              {
                 bitmap.Save(mss,ImageFormat.Gif);
              }
            }
            finally
            {
               bm.ReturnBuffer(buffer);
            }
       }
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Why not just new byte[]? Why BufferManager? It will 1) return buffers of lengths that are either 1M, 2M, 4M, 8M, 16M and so on (and I assume also buffers smaller than 1M, but didn't verify), so if you ask for 9M, you'll get a 16M array. 2) buffer managers will never clean up by themselves, so you have to manually call BufferManager.Clean(). See also stackoverflow.com/questions/7252417 and stackoverflow.com/questions/7265299 –  Eugene Beresovksy Sep 2 '11 at 1:28
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You may be seeing the same problem that I encountered when I asked this question on SO.

The problem in my case was that the MemoryStream was not releasing its internal byte[] even when calling Dispose on it. The byte[] is not freed until the MemoryStream goes out of scope and is collected by the GC.

This blog post details the cause of the problem, and also presents a working solution. It worked for me, and I suspect you are encountering the same problem. Essentially it wraps the underlying MemoryStream in a type that implements the same interface but sets the stream reference to null upon calling Dispose(). As no other objects should have a live reference to the internal stream this allows the GC to swoop in and clean it up.

Also, this issue is compounded by the fact that the internal byte[] will likely be allocated on the large object heap, which leads to fragmentation after multiple allocations.

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I am reading it know, did u use the whole class in your situation? –  syncis Jun 20 '11 at 20:58
    
Yep, I used the whole class. Not sure how you could get away with any less. It inherits from the abstract Stream class, so you have to implement all of those methods and that's what allows it to be treated as a Stream, even though all of the real work is passed down. –  Ed S. Jun 20 '11 at 21:01
    
So i put current memorystream inside the new wrappedstream right? using (WrappingStream wp = new WrappingStream(mss)) Gonna try it –  syncis Jun 20 '11 at 21:08
    
Yep, just like that. Also, I would suggest using a profiler if you're not already. The Redgate ANTS .NET Memory Profiler is awesome and they have a 14 day trial (I do not work for them, just like the product :) ) –  Ed S. Jun 20 '11 at 21:14
    
Didnt work :( Hmm –  syncis Jun 20 '11 at 21:17
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