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I'm trying to get the last result of a match without having to cycle through .find()

Here's my code:

                String in = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";
                Pattern p = Pattern.compile("num '([0-9]+) ");
                Matcher m = p.matcher(in);

                if (m.find())
                {
                    in= m.group(1);
                }

That will give me the first result. How do I find the LAST match without cycling through a potentionally huge list?

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Can you be sure it's the last thing in the string? If so just use the end of line anchor $ /(num ([0-9]+)$/, however that translates into java. –  Peter Chang Jun 20 '11 at 21:02
    
You could write a recursive method, but I doubt that it makes sense. –  s106mo Jun 20 '11 at 21:06
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9 Answers 9

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The following:

import java.util.regex.*;

class Test {
  public static void main (String[] args) {
    String in = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile("([0-9]+) mun");
    Matcher m = p.matcher(new StringBuilder(in).reverse());
    if(m.find()) {
      System.out.println(new StringBuilder(m.group(1)).reverse());
    }
  }
}

prints:

2134

Or is that cheating? :)

EDIT

Or this would also print 2134:

import java.util.regex.*;

class Test {
  public static void main (String[] args) {
    String in = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile(".*num ([0-9]+)");
    Matcher m = p.matcher(in);
    if(m.find()) {
      System.out.println(m.group(1));
    }
  }
}

But both "solutions" are not better than just looping through all matches using while(m.find()), IMO. You might want to tell use why don't you want to do that anyway?

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Yeah I think that's cheating :-). It would be extremely difficult to extend this to the general case. –  Mark Peters Jun 20 '11 at 21:48
1  
+1 for the second solution, but -1 for that abomination you started with. ;) –  Alan Moore Jun 20 '11 at 22:28
    
The reason I dont want to loop through while(m.find()) is that I'm parsing HTML and have a lot of results. I'm trying to make my code as efficient as possible. My thoughts are that needlessly looping through an entire array just to get the last one would be slow. Shame on Javas regex for not containing the number of results. I'll give yours a try. –  kireol Jun 21 '11 at 0:47
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Why not keep it simple?

in.replaceAll(".*[^\\d](\\d+).*", "$1")
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Could you explain what it does? –  KFleischer Jul 1 '13 at 10:14
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To get the last match even this works and not sure why this was not mentioned earlier:

String in = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("num '([0-9]+) ");
Matcher m = p.matcher(in);
if (m.find()) {
  in= m.group(m.groupCount());
}
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You are right! The thread startet did not want information about the index, only the content. This looks like the real right answer. –  KFleischer Jul 1 '13 at 10:18
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Java does not provide such a mechanism. The only thing I can suggest would be a binary search for the last index.

It would be something like this:

N = haystack.length();
if ( matcher.find(N/2) ) {
    recursively try right side
else
    recursively try left side

Edit

And here's code that does it since I found it to be an interesting problem:

import org.junit.Test;

import java.util.regex.Matcher;
import java.util.regex.Pattern;

import static org.junit.Assert.assertEquals;

public class RecursiveFind {
    @Test
    public void testFindLastIndexOf() {
        assertEquals(0, findLastIndexOf("abcdddddd", "abc"));
        assertEquals(1, findLastIndexOf("dabcdddddd", "abc"));
        assertEquals(4, findLastIndexOf("aaaaabc", "abc"));
        assertEquals(4, findLastIndexOf("aaaaabc", "a+b"));
        assertEquals(6, findLastIndexOf("aabcaaabc", "a+b"));
        assertEquals(2, findLastIndexOf("abcde", "c"));
        assertEquals(2, findLastIndexOf("abcdef", "c"));
        assertEquals(2, findLastIndexOf("abcd", "c"));
    }

    public static int findLastIndexOf(String haystack, String needle) {
        return findLastIndexOf(0, haystack.length(), Pattern.compile(needle).matcher(haystack));
    }

    private static int findLastIndexOf(int start, int end, Matcher m) {
        if ( start > end ) {
            return -1;
        }

        int pivot = ((end-start) / 2) + start;
        if ( m.find(pivot) ) {
            //recurse on right side
            return findLastIndexOfRecurse(end, m);
        } else if (m.find(start)) {
            //recurse on left side
            return findLastIndexOfRecurse(pivot, m);
        } else {
            //not found at all between start and end
            return -1;
        }
    }

    private static int findLastIndexOfRecurse(int end, Matcher m) {
        int foundIndex = m.start();
        int recurseIndex = findLastIndexOf(foundIndex + 1, end, m);
        if ( recurseIndex == -1 ) {
            return foundIndex;
        } else {
            return recurseIndex;
        }
    }

}

I haven't found a breaking test case yet.

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1  
this is a great solution. thanks for the code. –  kevinarpe Oct 7 '11 at 7:48
    
I found a corner case where it will not work: Make a pattern that consists of optional parts. If one part of the pattern falls on one side of the binary search, and the second on the other side, the search will find only a small part of the overall pattern. Your code is not finding the maximum match. –  KFleischer Jul 1 '13 at 10:13
    
@KFleischer: Isn't that as desirable in this case? Shouldn't the last occurrence of [a]+ in aaaa be at index 4, not at index 0? When you're searching for the last index of something, it seems reasonable to accept a minimal match if it results in a greater index. Maybe you could give a specific example if you think it's not desired behaviour. –  Mark Peters Jul 2 '13 at 3:34
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Java patterns are greedy by default, the following should do it.

    String in = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";
    Pattern p = Pattern.compile( ".*num ([0-9]+).*$" );
    Matcher m = p.matcher( in );

    if ( m.matches() )
    {
        System.out.println( m.group( 1 ));
    }
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Use negative lookahead:

String in = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("num (\\d+)(?!.*num \\d+)");
Matcher m = p.matcher(in);

if (m.find()) {
    in= m.group(1);
}

The regular expression reads as "num followed by one space and at least one digit without any (num followed by one space and at least one digit) at any point after it".

You can get even fancier by combining it with positive lookbehind:

String in = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("(?<=num )\\d+(?!.*num \\d+)");
Matcher m = p.matcher(in);

if (m.find()) {
    in = m.group();
}

That one reads as "at least one digit preceded by (num and one space) and not followed by (num followed by one space and at least one digit) at any point after it". That way you don't have to mess with grouping and worry about the potential IndexOutOfBoundsException thrown from Matcher.group(int).

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Regular expressions are greedy:

Matcher m=Pattern.compile(".*num '([0-9]+) ",Pattern.DOTALL).matcher("num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134");

will give you a Matcher for the last match, and you can apply it to most regexes by prepending ".*". Of course, if you can't use DOTALL, you might want to use (?:\d|\D) or something similar as your wildcard.

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This seems like a more equally plausible approach.

    public class LastMatchTest {
        public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {
            String target = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";
            Pattern regex = Pattern.compile("(?:.*?num.*?(\\d+))+");
            Matcher regexMatcher = regex.matcher(target);

            if (regexMatcher.find()) {
                System.out.println(regexMatcher.group(1));
            }
        }
    }

The .*? is a reluctant match so it won't gobble up everything. The ?: forces a non-capturing group so the inner group is group 1. Matching multiples in a greedy fashion causes it to match across the entire string until all matches are exhausted leaving group 1 with the value of your last match.

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String in = "num 123 num 1 num 698 num 19238 num 2134";  
Pattern p = Pattern.compile("num '([0-9]+) ");  
Matcher m = p.matcher(in);  
String result = "";

while (m.find())
{
     result = m.group(1);
}
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