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If I have a 2D array in D, I know that I can create 1D slices along rows as follows:

auto one_dim_arr=two_dim_arr[i][0..$]

is there a simple way to make a 1D slice along columns? Something that does what one might think

auto one_dim_arr=two_dim_arr[0..$][j]

would do?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is what a user-created type for this might look like:

// Demo

void main()
{
    int[3][3] arr = [
        [1, 2, 3],
        [4, 5, 6],
        [7, 8, 9],
    ];

    // simple creation
    auto middleColumn = verticalSlice(arr, 1);
    assert(middleColumn[1] == 5);

    // iteratable
    foreach (i, v; middleColumn)
        assert(v == 2+i*3);

    // still a slice - writing will change original array
    middleColumn[1] = 17;
    assert(arr[1][1] == 17);

    // sliceable itself
    auto center = middleColumn[1..2];
    center[0] = 42;
    assert(arr[1][1] == 42);

    // get a normal array with .dup
    int[] copyOfMiddleColumn = middleColumn.dup;
}

// Implementation

struct StepSlice(T)
{
    T* ptr;
    size_t length, step;

    T opIndex(size_t index)
    in { assert(index<length); }
    body { return ptr[step*index]; }

    void opIndexAssign(T value, size_t index)
    in { assert(index<length); }
    body { ptr[step*index] = value; }

    StepSlice!T opSlice(size_t start, size_t end)
    in { assert(start<=end && end<=length); }
    body { return StepSlice!T(ptr+start*step, end-start, step); }

    int opApply(int delegate(ref T) dg)
    {
        int result = 0;

        for (size_t i=0; i<length; i++)
        {
            result = dg(ptr[i*step]);
            if (result)
                break;
        }
        return result;
    }

    int opApply(int delegate(ref size_t, ref T) dg)
    {
        int result = 0;

        for (size_t i=0; i<length; i++)
        {
            result = dg(i, ptr[i*step]);
            if (result)
                break;
        }
        return result;
    }

    T[] dup()
    {
        T[] result = new T[length];
        for (size_t i=0; i<length; i++)
            result[i] = ptr[i*step];
        return result;
    }
}

StepSlice!T verticalSlice(T, size_t W)(T[W][] arr, size_t column)
{
    return StepSlice!T(arr[0].ptr+column, arr.length, W);
}

I think it's missing range primitives, but still a good starting point.


With std.range.stride:

import std.range;

// Demo

void main()
{
    int[3][3] arr = [
        [1, 2, 3],
        [4, 5, 6],
        [7, 8, 9],
    ];

    // simple creation
    auto middleColumn = verticalSlice(arr, 1);
    assert(middleColumn[1] == 5);

    // iteratable
    uint i;
    foreach (v; middleColumn)
        assert(v == 2+(i++)*3);

    // still a slice - writing will change original array
    middleColumn[1] = 17;
    assert(arr[1][1] == 17);

    // sliceable itself
    auto center = middleColumn[1..2];
    center[0] = 42;
    assert(arr[1][1] == 42);

    // get a normal array with array()
    int[] copyOfMiddleColumn = array(middleColumn);
}

// Implementation

auto verticalSlice(T, size_t W)(T[W][] arr, size_t column)
{
    T* start = arr[0].ptr+column;
    return stride(start[0..W*arr.length], W);
}
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2  
@Haunter: Would stride be of any help here by any chance? –  Mehrdad Jun 21 '11 at 4:23
1  
Yeah! I was looking for something like that. –  CyberShadow Jun 21 '11 at 4:27
1  
Lol, this is the first time I've seen an accepted answer get transferred to the same person it was originally from... –  Mehrdad Jun 21 '11 at 4:28

No, it's not possible. For this to work, D slices would need to have a step. It's possible to create a custom type which works similarly to a slice (e.g. std.algorithm.map).

Note that your suggested syntax above would compile fine, but not have the effect you're looking for.

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1  
What do you mean by "D slices would need to have a step"? I don't quite understand it. –  Andrew Spott Jun 20 '11 at 23:47
    
What do you mean by "a step"? –  Dan Jun 20 '11 at 23:48
2  
If you know how bidimensional arrays are represented in memory and how slices work, you'll know that the program will need to know the distance between elements on the same column from each row. This is what I meant by "step". Current D slices have an implied step of one. –  CyberShadow Jun 20 '11 at 23:59
    
I'm not sure if this is possible in many other languages either, is it? –  Mehrdad Jun 21 '11 at 0:30
1  
IIRC, Python allows slicing strings and arrays with a step, but it makes a copy of the data rather than creating a D-like slice. Implementing a custom type is possible in C++ as well. –  CyberShadow Jun 21 '11 at 4:25

If your input is a T[][] (i.e. a dynamic array of dynamic arrays) and you want the same as output, you can allocate a new 'outer' array and fill it with slices of the inner arrays. This will result in an O(n) op where as a normal slice is a O(1) op. The coding is left as an exercise for the reader.

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