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EDIT: Please let me be clear, I'm asking how to do this in Grails using Spring Dependency Injection, and NOT Grails' metaclass functionality or new().

I have a grails service that is for analyzing log files. Inside the service I use the current time for lots of things. For unit testing I have several example log files that I parse with this service. These have times in them obviously.

I want my service, DURING UNIT TESTING to think that the current time is no more than a few hours after the last logging statement in my example log files.

So, I'm willing to this:


class MyService {
    def currentDate = { -> new Date() }

    def doSomeStuff() {
        // need to know when is "right now"
        Date now = currentDate()
    }
}

So, what I want to be able to do is have currentDate injected or set to be some other HARDCODED time, like

currentDate = { -> new Date(1308619647140) }

Is there not a way to do this with some mockWhatever method inside my unit test? This kind of stuff was super easy with Google Guice, but I have no idea how to do it in Spring.

It's pretty frustrating that when I Google "grails dependency injection" all I find are examples of


class SomeController {
  // wow look how amazing this is, it's injected automatically!!
  // isn't spring incredible OMG!
  def myService
}

It feels like all that's showing me is that I don't have to type new ...()

Where do I tell it that when environment equals test, then do this:


currentDate = { -> new Date(1308619647140) }

Am I just stuck setting this property manually in my test??

I would prefer not to have to create a "timeService" because this seems silly considering I just want 1 tiny change.

share|improve this question
    
Thanks for the answers so far guys, but I really wanted to know how to do this using Spring/Grails Dependency Injection b/c as it seems to me the whole purpose of DI is this exact kind of contextual behavior. Is there seriously not a reasonable way to do this--load a different property depending on which Environment (test, production, or development) with Dependency Injection? If you can't do this then what is it actually for? –  orange80 Jun 21 '11 at 4:17
    
Grails will not inject dependencies during unit testing. It won't inject them during integration tests for the SUT class. See grails.org/doc/latest/guide/… . Maybe this is what you're looking for? grails.org/doc/latest/guide/… Check the section on Spring DSL. Then again, that will not work during unit testing. –  Gustavo Giráldez Jun 21 '11 at 5:10
    
Perhaps you could post the equivalent Google Guice code for what you're trying to achieve? –  Gustavo Giráldez Jun 21 '11 at 5:59

3 Answers 3

Groovy is a dynamic language, and as such it allows you to do almost what you're asking for:

class MyServiceTests extends GrailsUnitTestCase {
    def testDoSomeStuff() {
        def service = new MyService()
        service.currentDate = { -> new Date(1308619647140) }

        // assert something on service.doSomeStuff()
    }
}

Keep in mind this only modifies the service instance, not the class. If you need to modify the class you'll need to work with the metaClass. Take a look at this post by mrhaki.

Another option would be to make the current date a parameter to doSomeStuff(). That way you wouldn't need to modify your service instance.

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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Thanks for the help guys. The best solution I could come up with for using Spring DI in this case was to do the following in

resources.groovy

These are the two solutions I found:
1: If I want the timeNowService to be swapped for testing purposes everywhere:

import grails.util.GrailsUtil

// Place your Spring DSL code here
beans = {
    if (GrailsUtil.environment == 'test') {
        println ">>> test env"
        timeNowService(TimeNowMockService)
    } else {
        println ">>> not test env"
        timeNowService(TimeNowService)
    }
}


2: I could do this if I only want this change to apply to this particular service:

import grails.util.GrailsUtil

// Place your Spring DSL code here
beans = {

    if (GrailsUtil.environment == 'test') {
        println ">>> test env"
        time1(TimeNowMockService)
    } else {
        println ">>> not test env"
        time1(TimeNowService)
    }
    myService(MyService) {
        diTest = 'hello 2'
        timeNowService = ref('time1')
    }
}


In either case I would use the service by calling timeNowService.now(). The one strange, and very frustrating thing to me was that I could not do this:

import grails.util.GrailsUtil
// Place your Spring DSL code here
beans = {
    if (GrailsUtil.environment == 'test') {
        println ">>> test env"
        myService(MyService) {
            timeNow = { -> new Date(1308486447140) }
        }
    } else {
        println ">>> not test env"
        myService(MyService) {
            timeNow = { -> new Date() }
        }
    }
}

In fact, when I tried that I also had a dummy value in there, like dummy = 'hello 2' and then a default value of dummy = 'hello' in the myService class itself. And when I did this 3rd example with the dummy value set in there as well, it silently failed to set, apparently b/c timeNow blew something up in private.

I would be interested to know if anyone could explain why this fails.

Thanks for the help guys and sorry to be impatient...

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Since Groovy is dynamic, you could just take away your currentDate() method from your service and replace it by one that suits your need. You can do this at runtime during the setup of your test.

Prior to having an instance of MyService instantiated, have the following code executed:

MyService.metaClass.currentDate << {-> new Date(1308619647140) }

This way, you can have a consistent behavior across all your tests.

However, if you prefer, you can override the instance method by a closure that does the same trick.

Let me know how it goes.

Vincent Giguère

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