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Given an array of n+1 integers, each in the range 1 to n, find an integer that is repeated.

I was asked this at a job interview. Here's my answer: The Pigeonhole Principle says there has to be a repeat. I tried to use a binary search approach, so I did this in Matlab, because that's what I know:

top = 0;
bot = 0;
for i=1:n+1
  if P[i] > n/2 
    top = top+1;
  else
    bot = bot+1;
end

So then I argue that one of these, top or bot, has to be bigger than n/2 by the PhP again. Take that range and repeat.

I thought this was a pretty good solution, but the interviewer sort of hinted that one can do better. Please post any better solutions you know of.

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2  
But there can be lots of repeats, so I don't think those questions are the same as mine. Also, sorting is really slow. A lot slower than my answer. –  Daniel Jun 21 '11 at 4:56
    
@Matt Ball and other closers, I think we were hasty. The two dupes aren't really the same. –  PengOne Jun 21 '11 at 5:04
    
I agree; not the same question. Deserves to be re-opened. –  Nemo Jun 21 '11 at 5:05
    
@Daniel: By lots of repeats do you mean one integer repeated more than once or many integers repeated (possibly more than once)? –  Lorem Ipsum Jun 21 '11 at 5:13
    
Both. You can have any numbers at all between 1 and n as many times. That's why it's really hard. –  Daniel Jun 21 '11 at 5:15
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5 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I'm not sure how you're defining "better", but perhaps this qualifies. At least it's different from your solution and the solutions to the linked list questions (pun intended).

If we make a path

n+1 --> array[n+1] --> array[array[n+1]] --> ...

then this path contains a cycle if and only if array^k[n+1] = array^l[n+1] for some k != l, that is, if and only if there is a repeat. The question now becomes a common linked list problem that can be solved as follows.

Start two particles on the first node. Let the first particle move at unit speed and let the second particle move at twice unit speed. Then if there is a cycle, the second particle will end up looping back behind the first, and eventually they'll be the same. Why? Well, if you think of the particles as on a circle (which they will be once the find the loop), at every time unit the second particle gets one directed step closer to the first. Therefore they must eventually collide. One they do, you've found a loop. To find the repeated value, simply get the length of the loop by letting one particle stand still while the other runs the loop again. Then start both particles at the start again, let one move the length of the loop ahead, and then run both particles together with constant distance between them until they meet again at the beginning of the loop.

As some commentators are outraged that I did not include all of the details of how to find a loop in a linked list, here it now is. No promises that this isn't buggy (it's Matlab-esque pseudocode after all), but it should at least explain the idea.

%% STEP 1: find a point in the cycle of the linked list using a slow and fast particle
slow = n+1;
fast = n+1;
for i=1 to n+1
    slow = array[slow];
    fast = array[array[fast]];
    if (slow == fast)
        break;
end

%% STEP 2: find the length of the cycle by holding one particle fixed
length = 1;
fast = array[fast]
while fast != slow
    fast = array[fast];
    length = length+1;
end

%% STEP 3: find the repeated element by maintaining constant distance between particles
slow = n+1;
fast = n+1;
for i=1 to length
    fast = array[fast];
end
while fast != slow
    fast = array[fast];
    slow = array[slow];
end

%% STEP 4: return the repeated entry
return slow;

Here I started at n+1 because array[i] is between 1 and n, so neither particle will ever be sent back to n+1. This makes at most one pass through the array (though not in order) and keeps track of two particles (slow and fast) and one integer (length). The space is therefore O(1) and the time is O(n).

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1  
@Daniel: No, it cannot. This is the standard "pointer chasing" technique to detect cycles in a list. slow moves +1 each step, fast moves +2, so fast "gains" on slow by +1 each step. It cannot skip over it. –  Nemo Jun 21 '11 at 5:10
1  
@Daniel: A good question, but think about what happens when the fast particle is coming up behind the slow one. If the fast is one step behind, then they collide on the next step. If the fast one is two steps behind, then they collide in two steps. Make sense. –  PengOne Jun 21 '11 at 5:11
1  
This is linear time and constant space, and can be proved optimal. You need at least linear time (you have to look at every array entry), and you need at least constant space. –  ShreevatsaR Jun 21 '11 at 5:39
2  
@fiver: The solution wasn't incorrect at any time, just incomplete. It illustrated the core idea (cycle detection), which was sufficient for anyone who thinks hard enough to complete the algorithm. But yes, a complete answer is better, which it now is. Perhaps thanks to your comments. :-) –  ShreevatsaR Jun 22 '11 at 16:24
2  
Ah, the critical part is starting at element n+1, since that can't be part of any "ordinary" duplicate-free cycle... Very clever! –  j_random_hacker Jun 28 '11 at 1:57
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If you know that there is exactly one number that is duplicate you can find it by summing all of them and subtracting the sum of numbers from 1 to n:

duplicate = sum P[i] - n(n+1)/2

If not, then you can iterate through the array and put each number in a hashtable. If the number already exists then that's the duplicate. This is also O(n) assuming the hashtable operations are O(1).

Or event better - to avoid the hashtable you can use an array of booleans of size n:

int[] P = new int[] { 3, 2, 5, 1, 4, 2 };
bool[] Q = new bool[6];

foreach( var p in P ){
    if ( Q[p] ) {
        Console.WriteLine("Duplicate: " + p);
        break;
    }
    Q[p] = true;
}
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1  
THis won't work. There can be lots of repeats maybe. –  Daniel Jun 21 '11 at 4:57
    
This second one is slower than the binary solution I think. –  Daniel Jun 21 '11 at 5:08
1  
Not really. This iterates over the array only once, while the binary solution iterates over some parts of the array more than once. –  Petar Ivanov Jun 21 '11 at 5:21
    
But you have to save too much information. I want to do better in space and time. –  Daniel Jun 21 '11 at 5:23
3  
True. But when you say "slower" you mean time. So it's not slower! It's faster, but takes more space. –  Petar Ivanov Jun 21 '11 at 5:27
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for(int i=n+1;i!=a[i];i=a[i]);

cout<<i;
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 boost::dynamic_bitset<> bits(N, 0ul);
 for(int i = 0; i < N; ++i)
 {
    if(bits.test(ArrayOfInt[i]-1) 
    {
     //duplicate found
    }
    else
    {
     bits.set(ArrayOfInt[i]-1)
    }
 }
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1  
How rude to downvote without commenting! :p –  T33C Jun 22 '11 at 14:49
    
Simple, fast, correct. –  Jirka-x1 Jul 3 '11 at 11:56
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How about this simple solution:

start creating a binary search tree from the array. Whenever there is an element already present which is a duplicate while you are inserting into the BST then store that element in another array of duplicate elements and continue your loop .we don't even need to sort the array for finding the duplicates here.

This is just my idea.I was asked the same question in one of the interviews and this was my answer.

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