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What does normative and non-normative mean in reference to XML documents as stated in the w3.org document? It really is not explained and just assumes we know what it means. Thanks.

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"Normative" means that it's an official formal part of the specification; non-normative means that it's there to be helpful and aid understanding, but you can't appeal to it in a court of law (so to speak).

I'm afraid that specifications from standard bodies like W3C, just like legal contracts, are written in formal language that the reader is expected to understand. It's worth persevering, because once you've got over the initial hurdle of some unfamiliar language, it's actually much easier to get a definitive answer to many of the kinds of questions that people ask on forums like this by referring to the official standard than by reading the tutorial sites that try to make it more friendly but lose precision in the process.

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Thank you, @Michael Kay, for a very clear answer. I will keep persevering. (It would help if these formal docs would just have a sentence or two in a footnote explaining what you said.) –  nlper Jun 22 '11 at 0:02
    
"...it's actually much easier to get a definitive answer to many of the kinds of questions that people ask on forums like this by referring to the official standard than by reading the tutorial sites that try to make it more friendly but lose precision in the process." Couldn't have said it better myself. –  yroc Feb 15 '13 at 14:02
    
I'm sorry to sound stupid, but I'm still not sure: Does non-normative mean that such thing is not a part of official speification, but rather only an idea? –  Tomáš Zato May 25 at 13:46
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Non-normative text is part of the official specification, but is at least in theory redundant and inessential. Sometimes it consists of examples to help you check that you have understood the specification correctly, sometimes it gives notes to explain implications of what the specification says, sometimes it is purely editorial material like acknowledgements or references to background reading. None of those quite fit your term "only an idea" –  Michael Kay May 25 at 22:04

The reason we divide specs into "normative" and "non-normative" is so that people know which source to trust if they disagree. For instance, a Working Group might write a tutorial or a set of examples or a position paper that contains an error which contradicts the normative specification. The normative specification is the one you should trust.

Sometimes a Working Group will cover the same material in different ways in two normative specs. When they do this, they are saying that these two specifications must agree, and any disagreement between them is an error which must be corrected by the Working Group.

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Thank you, @mikewied, for your response. It helped me to get a sense of why they were using this type of terminology. I also checked @mu is too short 's reference to normative in wikipedia. He is right. The explanation is very dense. Thanks. –  nlper Jun 22 '11 at 0:05

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