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I have an xml that has a description node:

<config>
  <desc>A <b>first</b> sentence here. The second sentence with some link <a href="myurl">The link</a>. The <u>third</u> one.</desc>
</config>

I am trying to split the sentences using dot as separator but keeping in the same time in the HTML output the eventual HTML tags. What I have so far is a template that splits the description but the HTML tags are lost in the output due to the normalize-space and substring-before functions. My current template is given below:

<xsl:template name="output-tokens">
  <xsl:param name="sourceText" />

  <!-- Force a . at the end -->
  <xsl:variable name="newlist" select="concat(normalize-space($sourceText), ' ')" />
  <!-- Check if we have really a point at the end -->
  <xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test ="contains($newlist, '.')">
      <!-- Find the first . in the string -->
      <xsl:variable name="first" select="substring-before($newlist, '.')" />

      <!-- Get the remaining text -->
      <xsl:variable name="remaining" select="substring-after($newlist, '.')" />
      <!-- Check if our string is not in fact a . or an empty string -->
      <xsl:if test="normalize-space($first)!='.' and normalize-space($first)!=''">
        <p><xsl:value-of select="normalize-space($first)" />.</p>
      </xsl:if>
      <!-- Recursively apply the template for the remaining text -->
      <xsl:if test="$remaining">
        <xsl:call-template name="output-tokens">
          <xsl:with-param name="sourceText" select="$remaining" />
        </xsl:call-template>
      </xsl:if>
    </xsl:when>
    <!--If no . was found -->
    <xsl:otherwise>
      <p>
        <!-- If the string does not contains a . then display the text but avoid 
           displaying empty strings 
         -->
        <xsl:if test="normalize-space($sourceText)!=''">
          <xsl:value-of select="normalize-space($sourceText)" />.
        </xsl:if>
      </p>
    </xsl:otherwise>
  </xsl:choose>
</xsl:template>

and I am using it in the following manner:

<xsl:template match="config">
  <xsl:call-template name="output-tokens">
       <xsl:with-param name="sourceText" select="desc" />
  </xsl:call-template>
</xsl:template>

The expected output is:

<p>A <b>first</b> sentence here.</p>
<p>The second sentence with some link <a href="myurl">The link</a>.</p>
<p>The <u>third</u> one.</p>
share|improve this question
    
If you need tags also, I'm afraid that your current template is unsusable. You should change your mind as sir @Michael Kay suggests. I think you need a two-pass transform. –  empo Jun 21 '11 at 11:27
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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is one way to implement the second approach suggested by Michael Kay using XSLT 2.

This stylesheet demonstrates a two-pass transformation where the first pass introduces <stop/> markers after each sentence and the second pass encloses all groups ending with a <stop/> in a paragraph.

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0" 
                xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

  <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

  <!-- two-pass processing -->
  <xsl:template match="/">
    <xsl:variable name="intermediate">
      <xsl:apply-templates mode="phase-1"/>
    </xsl:variable>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="$intermediate" mode="phase-2"/>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- identity transform -->
  <xsl:template match="@*|node()" mode="#all" priority="-1">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="@*|node()" mode="#current"/>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- phase 1 -->

  <!-- insert <stop/> "milestone markup" after each sentence -->
  <xsl:template match="text()" mode="phase-1">
    <xsl:analyze-string select="." regex="\.\s+">
      <xsl:matching-substring>
        <xsl:value-of select="regex-group(0)"/>
        <stop/>
      </xsl:matching-substring>
      <xsl:non-matching-substring>
        <xsl:value-of select="."/>
      </xsl:non-matching-substring>
    </xsl:analyze-string>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- phase 2 -->

  <!-- turn each <stop/>-terminated group into a paragraph -->
  <xsl:template match="*[stop]" mode="phase-2">
    <xsl:copy>
      <xsl:for-each-group select="node()" group-ending-with="stop">
        <p>
          <xsl:apply-templates select="current-group()" mode="#current"/>
        </p>
      </xsl:for-each-group>
    </xsl:copy>
  </xsl:template>

  <!-- remove the <stop/> markers -->
  <xsl:template match="stop" mode="phase-2"/>

</xsl:stylesheet>
share|improve this answer
    
+1 indeed! Nice to see a first practical solution. –  empo Jun 21 '11 at 22:31
    
Thanks Jukka for this solution. This is a good and functional solution. I come now with a new problem that I did not figure yet how to solve it: Let's say you want to output/translate only the first node of type <desc> (assuming you have several config nodes, several <desc> nodes and also other nodes having text similar to <desc> but you want only a particular node to be transformed). How this can be done? –  Lycaon Jul 8 '11 at 7:44
    
@Lycaon, if you want limit the transformation to only specific parts of the document, the easiest way would be to be more selective where the <stop/> markers are introduced. So for example, to apply the transformation only to the contents of the first desc node in the document, you would change the match attribute value from the phase-1 template from text() to desc[not(preceding::desc)]/text(). Or if you wanted to transform only the contents of the first <desc> inside a <config>, you could use config/desc[1]/text(), and so on. –  Jukka Matilainen Jul 13 '11 at 5:47
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A good question, and not an easy one to solve. Especially, of course, if you're using XSLT 1.0 (you really need to tell us if that's the case).

I've seen two approaches to the problem. Both involve breaking it into smaller problems.

The first approach is to convert the markup into text (for example replace <b>first</b> by [b]first[/b]), then use text manipulation operations (xsl:analyze-string) to split it into sentences, and then reconstitute the markup within the sentences.

The second approach (which I personally prefer) is to convert the text delimiters into markup (convert "." to <stop/>) and then use positional grouping techniques (typically <xsl:for-each-group group-ending-with="stop"/> to convert the sentences into paragraphs.)

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your quick answer. I am using XSLT 2.0. I already thought to the first solution but as I am a newbie in XSLT I already encountered some difficulties in implementing it as I am receiving in my template a list of nodes and not the HTML tags. Any help/sample would be highly appreciated. –  Lycaon Jun 21 '11 at 8:22
    
+1 for good suggestion which made possible a practical solution. –  empo Jun 21 '11 at 23:41
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This is my humble solution, based on the second suggestion of @Michael Kay answer.

Differently from @Jukka answer (which is very elegant indeed) I'm not using xsl:analyse-string, as XPath 1.0 functions contains and substring-after are enough to accomplish the split. I've also started the match pattern from the config.

Here's the transform:

<xsl:stylesheet version="2.0"
    xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">

    <xsl:output method="xml" indent="yes"/>

    <!-- two pass processing -->
    <xsl:template match="config">
        <xsl:variable name="pass1">
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()"/>
        </xsl:variable>
        <xsl:apply-templates mode="pass2" select="$pass1/*"/>
    </xsl:template>

    <!-- 1. Copy everything as is (identity) -->
    <xsl:template match="node()|@*">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <!-- 1. Replace "text. text" with "text<dot/> text" -->
    <xsl:template match="text()[contains(.,'. ')]">
        <xsl:value-of select="substring-before(.,'. ')"/>
        <dot/>
        <xsl:value-of select="substring-after(.,'. ')"/>
    </xsl:template>

    <!-- 2. Group by examining in population order ending with dot -->
    <xsl:template match="desc" mode="pass2">
        <xsl:for-each-group select="node()" 
            group-ending-with="dot">
            <p><xsl:apply-templates select="current-group()" mode="pass2"/></p>
        </xsl:for-each-group>
    </xsl:template>

    <!-- 2. Identity -->
    <xsl:template match="node()|@*" mode="pass2">
        <xsl:copy>
            <xsl:apply-templates select="node()|@*" mode="pass2"/>
        </xsl:copy>
    </xsl:template>

    <!-- 2. Replace dot with mark -->
    <xsl:template match="dot" mode="pass2">
        <xsl:text>.</xsl:text>
    </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

Applied on the input shown in your question, produces:

<p>A <b>first</b> sentence here.</p>
<p>The second sentence with some link <a href="myurl">The link</a>.</p>
<p>The <u>third</u> one.</p>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks Empo for this solution. This is also a functional and good practical solution. It still remains a question about transforming only a particular node (only one desc, for ex.) that I couldn't answer yet. –  Lycaon Jul 8 '11 at 7:47
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