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Consider this example code:

template<class D>
char register_(){
    return D::get_dummy(); // static function
}

template<class D>
struct Foo{
    static char const dummy;
};

template<class D>
char const Foo<D>::dummy = register_<D>();

struct Bar
    : Foo<Bar>
{
    static char const get_dummy() { return 42; }
};

(Also on Ideone.)

I'd expect dummy to get initialized as soon as there is a concrete instantiation of Foo, which I have with Bar. This question (and the standard quote at the end) explained pretty clear, why that's not happening.

[...] in particular, the initialization (and any associated side-effects) of a static data member does not occur unless the static data member is itself used in a way that requires the definition of the static data member to exist.

Is there any way to force dummy to be initialized (effectively calling register_) without any instance of Bar or Foo (no instances, so no constructor trickery) and without the user of Foo needing to explicitly state the member in some way? Extra cookies for not needing the derived class to do anything.


Edit: Found a way with minimal impact on the derived class:

struct Bar
    : Foo<Bar>
{   //                              vvvvvvvvvvvv
    static char const get_dummy() { (void)dummy; return 42; }
};

Though, I'd still like the derived class not having to do that. :|

share|improve this question
    
We generally don't want the compiler to initialize all unused variables in all class templates. How should the compiler know that in this case you want it to? By actually using it? –  Bo Persson Jun 21 '11 at 6:34
1  
@Bo: Sure, but I'd like to hide that use from the derived class / outer world and would rather somehow get that into Foo itself. :/ –  Xeo Jun 21 '11 at 6:35
    
@Xeo: static char const get_dummy() { (void)dummy; return 42; } - I doubt that this circular dependency between Bar::get_dummy() and Foo<Bar>::dummy is guaranteed to work (by the standard). Looks like highly implementation-dependent trick. Am I wrong? –  Serge Dundich Jun 21 '11 at 6:47
    
@Serge: Why shouldn't it? The dummy in get_dummy is the uninitialized one, sure, but that doesn't matter. :) I don't actually use it anyways. –  Xeo Jun 21 '11 at 10:06
    
@Xeo: "The dummy in get_dummy is the uninitialized one, sure, but that doesn't matter. :) I don't actually use it anyways." Yea. But why it is supposed to force Foo<Bar>::dummy to become initialized? And what is supposed to prevent compiler from optimizing statement (void)dummy; (that has no effect) out. –  Serge Dundich Jun 21 '11 at 10:21

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Consider:

template<typename T, T> struct value { };

template<typename T>
struct HasStatics {
  static int a; // we force this to be initialized
  typedef value<int&, a> value_user;
};

template<typename T>
int HasStatics<T>::a = /* whatever side-effect you want */ 0;

It's also possible without introducing any member:

template<typename T, T> struct var { enum { value }; };
typedef char user;

template<typename T>
struct HasStatics {
  static int a; // we force this to be initialized
  static int b; // and this

  // hope you like the syntax!
  user :var<int&, a>::value,
       :var<int&, b>::value;
};

template<typename T>
int HasStatics<T>::a = /* whatever side-effect you want */ 0;

template<typename T>
int HasStatics<T>::b = /* whatever side-effect you want */ 0;
share|improve this answer
    
The first one seems to work on GCC, but is no good in MSVC10, no initialization happens. :/ The second one works on neither GCC nor MSVC10. :( Edit: Oh wait, with C++0x enabled it works on GCC. Still no luck with MSVC... –  Xeo Jun 23 '11 at 20:52
    
@Xeo it works for me without c++0x on gcc4.6. Don't have any other compiler to try, except clang. On clang the second one doesn't work either. PR is on the way. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 23 '11 at 20:57
    
Oh Gosh! what user :var<int&, a>::value does mean? –  pure cuteness Jun 23 '11 at 21:00
3  
@pure: It's an unnamed bitfield, effectively a char : 0; –  Xeo Jun 23 '11 at 21:07

How are you checking the value set by Bar. I changed your code and added another function in bar as:

....
static char const get_dummy(int){return Foo<Bar>::dummy;}
....

and it is giving me exactly the expected result. I may not be understanding correctly, what do you exactly want to achieve ?

Static members are shared among the objects so their scope must be resolved at access. that is why we use :: by telling compiler explicitly that this is the member of the class we want to access.

share|improve this answer

Something like that comes to my mind:

// in some c++ file (to make i with internal linkage)
static int i = init_dummy(Foo<int>::dummy);

where init_dummy is defined like this:

int init_dummy(...)
{
  return 1;
}

Due to variable args you can put more initializations there like:

static int i = init_dummy(Foo<int>::dummy, Foo<double>::dummy, Foo<whatever>::dummy);
share|improve this answer

Is there any way to force dummy to be initialized (effectively calling register_) without any instance of Bar or Foo (no instances, so no constructor trickery)?

Wouldn't this be sufficient?

std::cout << Foo<int>::dummy;
share|improve this answer
    
I hope there are other ways than having the user to explicitly state the member. :| –  Xeo Jun 21 '11 at 6:10
5  
You asked for "any way" :) –  StackedCrooked Jun 21 '11 at 6:11
    
Yeah, clarified. ;) –  Xeo Jun 21 '11 at 6:11

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