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What is the safest way to make a snippet of code run at the beginning of every AJAX success callback? I'm creating an time-sensitive website and would like each AJAX to synch the user's clock with the server's clock. Below is an example of the code I'd like to run. I'd rather not have to duplicate this code across all my AJAX (even if it was made into a function).

new Ajax.Request(
 'someLink.php', {
  onSuccess: function(transport) {
   var dateHeader = transport.getHeader('Date');
   if (dateHeader === null) {
    USER.serverDrift = 0;
   } else {
    USER.serverDrift = (new Date(dateHeader).getTime() 
     - (new Date().getTime())) / 1000;
   }
   // application specific code here
  }
 }
);
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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

One way would be to wrap the code want to run in a function and then have that function call your onSuccess code. Obviously this wrapped function would have to be returned from a function:

var checkDriftOnSuccess = function(onSuccess) {
  return function(transport) {
    var dateHeader = transport.getHeader('Date');
    if (!dateHeader) {
      USER.serverDrift = 0;
    } else {
      USER.serverDrift = (new Date(dateHeader).getTime() 
         - (new Date().getTime())) / 1000;
    }
    onSuccess(transport);
  };
};

And you'd call it like this:

new Ajax.Request(
  'someLink.php', {
    onSuccess: checkDriftOnSuccess(function(transport) {
      // application specific code here
    })
  } 
);

UPDATE: another way, by replacing the Prototype constructor. Not favored by me (a) because I don't know the Prototype codebase, and (b) there may be instanceOf issues, and (c) I haven't actually tested it.

var ajaxReplacer = (function() {
  var oldRequest;

  var checkDriftOnSuccess = function(onSuccess) {
    return function(transport) {
      var dateHeader = transport.getHeader('Date');
      if (!dateHeader) {
        USER.serverDrift = 0;
      } else {
        USER.serverDrift = (new Date(dateHeader).getTime() 
           - (new Date().getTime())) / 1000;
      }
      onSuccess(transport);
    };
  };

  // save the real constructor
  oldRequest = Ajax.Request;

  // define a new constructor that wraps the onSuccess callback
  Ajax.Request = function(url, options) {
    if (options.onSuccess) {
      options.onSuccess = checkDriftOnSuccess(options.onSuccess);   
    }
    // call the real constructor
    return new oldRequest(url, options);
    // alternately, call the real constructor using a function call
    // return oldRequest.call(this, url, options);
  };
  Ajax.Request.prototype = oldRequest.prototype;

  return {
    reset: function() {
      Ajax.Request = oldRequest;
    }
  }; 

}());

In essence it creates a new object called ajaxReplacer. This has one method, reset that returns everything to the default Prototype behavior (a one-shot deal). Creating the object will replace the ajax request constructor to one that calls the special code in onSuccess.

Note I have two ways of calling the old code. I do not know which one will work properly since I don't use Prototype. Test, test, and test again. If it works, great. If it doesn't, maybe I forgot to do something, or it gives you enough ideas to really do it, or you just can't do this easily.

share|improve this answer
    
I was hoping for a a way where I don't have to change my hundreds of Ajax existing calls. –  JoJo Jun 22 '11 at 19:11
    
OK, see the new code where I replace the Ajax.Request constructor. Personally speaking: I don't like this; I hate constructor functions. –  boyetboy Jun 23 '11 at 7:10

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