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I'm having trouble figuring out which is better in C++:

I use a struct to manage clients in a message queue, the struct looks like this:

typedef struct _MsgClient {
  int handle;
  int message_class;
  void *callback;
  void *private_data;
  int priority;
} MsgClient;

All of these being POD entities.

Now, I have an array of these structs where I store my clients (I use an array for memory constraints, I have to limit fragmentation). So in my class I have something like this:

class Foo
{
private:
  MsgClient _clients[32]; 

public:
  Foo()
  {
     memset(_clients, 0x0, sizeof(_clients));
  }

}

Now, I read here and there on SO that using memset is bad in C++, and that I'd rather use a constructor for my structure. I figured something like this:

typedef struct _MsgClient {
  int handle;
  int message_class;
  void *callback;
  void *private_data;
  int priority;
  // struct constructor
  _MsgClient(): handle(0), message_class(0), callback(NULL), private_data(NULL), priority(0) {};
} MsgClient;

...would eliminate the need of the memset. But my fear is that when foo is initialized, the struct constructor will be called 32 times, instead of optimizing it as a simple zero out of the memory taken by the array.

What's your opinion on this?
I just found this: Can a member struct be zero-init from the constructor initializer list without calling memset? , is it appropriate in my case (which is different: I have an array, not a single instance of the structure)?
Also, according to this post, adding a constructor to my structure will automatically convert it into a non-POD structure, is it right?

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4  
I can't answer the entire question, but yes, adding a custom constructor to either a struct or class will make it a non-POD structure. –  nil Jun 21 '11 at 7:31
    
+1 Its an interesting question - although even if you had an array of 100 million _clients I doubt using the constructor will cause performance issues. And initialising each type appropriately rather than just zeroing memory is the safest thing to do. But I too would be interested to know what c++ implementations do behind the scenes in terms of initialation - whether they actually call memset anyway. –  Tom Jun 21 '11 at 7:39
    
Just so you know, if you put a virtual function in this class, memset will effectively screw it up. –  Nicol Bolas Jun 21 '11 at 7:45
    
@Nicol: yeah that's what I understood by looking at the other similar questions. I wouldn't use memset AND a constructor, for me they are exclusive. –  Gui13 Jun 21 '11 at 7:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

On a conforming implementation, it's perfectly valid to value-initialize an array in the constructor initializer list with an empty member initializer. For your array members, this will have the effect of zero-initializing the members of each array element.

The compiler should be able to make this very efficient and there's no need for you to add a constructor to your struct.

E.g.

Foo() : _clients() {}
share|improve this answer
    
Yeap, and this will likely be implemented via memset() anyway - no need to think about portability, the compiler will think of how to do it best. –  sharptooth Jun 21 '11 at 7:37
1  
+1: Though I would want to actually test this by looking at the assembly output in a case where the compiler is forced to assume that the initialized values will be used. –  Omnifarious Jun 21 '11 at 7:38
    
Visual C++ >2005 counts as "conforming" for this particular case: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/1ywe7hcy%28v=vs.80%29.aspx . –  Charles Bailey Jun 21 '11 at 7:41
    
Allright, this construction seems to work, compiling-wise. I'll test it further on but I feel this is the good thing to do :) –  Gui13 Jun 21 '11 at 7:53
    
Now hold on. Can you find a paragraph in the standard which defines this behaviour? Because I am sure it is not the case for gcc. As far as I know, object of POD type if initialized this way contain garbage –  BЈовић Jun 21 '11 at 8:13

You can you memset freely even in C++, as long as you understand what you are doing. About the performance - the only way to see which way is really faster is to build your program in release configuration, and then see in the disassembler the code generated.

Using memset sounds somewhat faster than per-object initialization. However there's a chance the compiler will generated the same code.

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2  
Just a point of pedantry: That sentence should be: "The only way to see why way is faster ... and then compare them by profiling." Looking at the disassembler won't necessarily be the easiest way of determining which is faster. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 21 '11 at 7:39

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