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It had been a while since GCC caught me with this one, but it just happened today. But I've never understood why GCC requires typedef typename within templates, while VS and I guess ICC don't. Is the typedef typename thing a "bug" or an overstrict standard, or something that is left up to the compiler writers?

For those who don't know what I mean here is a sample:

template<typename KEY, typename VALUE>
bool find(const std::map<KEY,VALUE>& container, const KEY& key)
{
    std::map<KEY,VALUE>::const_iterator iter = container.find(key);
    return iter!=container.end();
}

The above code compiles in VS (and probably in ICC), but fails in GCC because it wants it like this:

template<typename KEY, typename VALUE>
bool find(const std::map<KEY,VALUE>& container, const KEY& key)
{
    typedef typename std::map<KEY,VALUE>::const_iterator iterator; //typedef typename
    iterator = container.find(key);
    return iter!=container.end();
}

Note: This is not an actual function I'm using but just something silly that demonstrates the problem

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1  
The reason it is needed in g++, is because g++ is more compliant with the standard. VS was a bit lax on this part of the templatisation parsing (which has lead to other problems in more complex templates). –  Loki Astari Mar 13 '09 at 16:18
    
Yes but why does the standard friggin do this? I've dealt with identical code! –  Joe Soul-bringer Dec 29 '09 at 8:39
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5 Answers

up vote 39 down vote accepted

The typename is required by the standard. Template compilation requires a two step verification. During the first pass the compiler must verify the template syntax without actually supplying the type substitutions. In this step, std::map::iterator is assumed to be a value. If it does denote a type, the typename keyword is required.

Why is this necessary? Before substituing the actual KEY and VALUE types, the compiler cannot guarantee that the template is not specialized and that the specialization is not redefining the iterator keyword as something else.

You can check it with this code:

class X {};
template <typename T>
struct Test
{
   typedef T value;
};
template <>
struct Test<X>
{
   static int value;
};
int Test<X>::value = 0;
template <typename T>
void f( T const & )
{
   Test<T>::value; // during first pass, Test<T>::value is interpreted as a value
}
int main()
{
  f( 5 );  // compilation error
  X x; f( x ); // compiles fine f: Test<T>::value is an integer
}

The last call fails with an error indicating that during the first template compilation step of f() Test::value was interpreted as a value but instantiation of the Test<> template with the type X yields a type.

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2  
Good example of failure case –  Robert Gould Mar 13 '09 at 13:05
    
I think you mixed up your comments on the two calls to f, f( X() ); succeeds while f( 5 ); is a compile error. Anyway, MSVC handles this alright -- it seems to delay the decision of whether Test<T>::value is a value or a type until the template has been instantiated. It doesn't do this for members of a class template, however. –  Sumudu Fernando Nov 24 '09 at 3:32
    
@Sumudu: you are right, I also corrected the f( X() ) call into the more explicit code above. If MSVC delays the check until the type is instantiated then MSVC is not complying with the standard. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Nov 25 '09 at 23:57
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Well, GCC doesn't actually require the typedef -- typename is sufficient. This works:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>

template<typename KEY, typename VALUE>
bool find(const std::map<KEY,VALUE>& container, const KEY& key)
{
    typename std::map<KEY,VALUE>::const_iterator iter = container.find(key);
    return iter!=container.end();
}

int main() {
    std::map<int, int> m;
    m[5] = 10;
    std::cout << find(m, 5) << std::endl;
    std::cout << find(m, 6) << std::endl;
    return 0;
}

This is an example of a context sensitive parsing problem. What the line in question means is not apparent from the syntax in this function only -- you need to know whether std::map<KEY,VALUE>::const_iterator is a type or not.

Now, I can't seem to think of an example of what ...::const_iterator might be except a type, that would also not be an error. So I guess the compiler can find out that it has to be a type, but it might be difficult for the poor compiler (writers).

The standard requires the use of typename here, according to litb by section 14.6/3 of the standard.

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Here, too, I think you mean KEY,VALUE in the line that starts with "typename". With that change, it compiles for me. :) –  unwind Mar 13 '09 at 11:34
    
I saw your comment on the question and fixed it just now :) –  Magnus Hoff Mar 13 '09 at 11:34
    
yes, it is indeed required. for a reference see 14.6/3 –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 13 '09 at 11:40
1  
for a good faq, consider womble.decadentplace.org.uk/c++/… –  Johannes Schaub - litb Mar 13 '09 at 11:44
2  
Simple example of fragment where compiler cannot parse without typename: (X::t)(y), is that a cast or function call? Note the precedence is different too! Whoever added typedef to C should be shot:) –  Yttrill Nov 30 '10 at 16:46
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It looks like VS/ICC supplies the typename keyword wherever it thinks it is required. Note this is a Bad Thing (TM) -- to let the compiler decide what you want. This further complicates the issue by instilling the bad habit of skipping the typename when required and is a portability nightmare. This is definitely not the standard behavior. Try in strict standard mode or Comeau.

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4  
It would be a Bad Thing if the compiler did so willy-nilly. In fact, it's doing this only on broken code. There's actually no prohibition in the standard against compiling broken code. Should still be a warning (diagnostic) though. –  MSalters Mar 13 '09 at 13:45
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This is a bug in the Microsoft C++ compiler - in your example, std::map::iterator might not be a type (you could have specialised std::map on KEY,VALUE so that std::map::iterator was a variable for example).

GCC forces you to write correct code (even though what you meant was obvious), whereas the Microsoft compiler correctly guesses what you meant (even though the code you wrote was incorrect).

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1  
Actually, it looks like MSVC will check to see whether std::map::iterator is a type or not before deciding. I don't have a copy of the standard but this seems like non-conforming behaviour, but it only means that it will (try to) correct and compile some incorrect programs, not introduce errors into correct ones. –  Sumudu Fernando Nov 24 '09 at 3:46
1  
Yes, it's a bug because the compiler doesn't issue a diagnostic for illegal code. –  Joe Gauterin Dec 30 '09 at 12:23
2  
There's no such thing as illegal code. A diagnostic is only required if the program is ill-formed. –  Yttrill Nov 30 '10 at 16:53
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It should be noted that the value/type kinding issue is not the fundamental problem. The primary issue is parsing. Consider

template<class T>
void f() { (T::x)(1); }

There is no way to tell if this is a cast or a function call unless the typename keyword is mandatory. In that case, the above code contains a function call. In general the choice cannot be delayed without forgoing parsing altogether, just consider fragment

(a)(b)(c)

In case you didn't remember, cast has a higher precedence than function call in C, one reason Bjarne wanted function style casts. It is therefore not possible to tell if the above means

(a)(b)  (c)   // a is a typename

or

(a) (b)(c)    // a is not a typename , b is

or

(a)(b) (c)    // neither a nor b is a typename

where I inserted space to indicate grouping.

Note also "templatename" keyword is required for the same reason as "typename", you can't parse things without knowing their kind in C/C++.

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MSVC uses an incredibly simple solution to this problem: it doesn't parse code inside a template function until the template is instantiated with a specific T. IMO that's a far more pleasant solution for developers than requiring lots of extra "this->", "typename" and "template" keywords, and lots of extra typedefs to redefine names that are already defined in a base class. (Yeah, yeah, I know, MSVC is not standard--but it's easier to use.) –  Qwertie Mar 26 '12 at 19:25
    
However that behaviour exposes one to the possibility the semantics of two distinct instantiations are more different than the existing poor C++ rules already allow. –  Yttrill Mar 28 '12 at 0:25
    
True, but after spending dozens of hours converting my template code to be correct standard C++ by adding lots of syntactic noise, while puzzling over GCC's useless error messages (some of my favorites: "declaration of ‘operator =’ as non-function", "too few template-parameter-lists", "expected primary-expression before ‘>’ token")... I have come to loathe the official rules of C++. –  Qwertie Jun 6 '12 at 19:35
    
@Qwertie, agreed. While MSVC may not be strictly conforming by allowing typenames to be ommitted in many instances, in my 16 years of using it I've never encountered a case where this behavior caused unexpected behavior in the resulting binaries. I'm just now porting some code over to GCC and am loving all of the errors it gives that don't provide any clue that a missing typename is the actual problem. Another word that begins with 't' comes to mind. –  Josh Heitzman Dec 12 '12 at 7:00
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