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Here is an interesting one, it is only happening with one database file, not with any others that I have. I cured this problem but thought it was quite interesting.

I have a table -

<partial table>
CREATE TABLE [horsestats] (
[horseID] INTEGER  NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
[name] VARCHAR(30)  NULL,
[flatrating] INTEGER DEFAULT '0' NULL
);

All of the zero values in the table are set by the default value, any other has been set by my software. About 70% of the records has a value set. So, if we run this -

Select horsestats.flatrating FROM horsestats WHERE horsestats.flatrating<>0 ORDER BY horsestats.flatrating DESC LIMIT 20;

We don't really expect this -

flatrating
0
0
0
etc

In fact only values that are 0 are listed, none of the values that are not zero are in the output. If we reverse it we might expect only values not 0 to be listed:

Select horsestats.flatrating FROM horsestats WHERE horsestats.flatrating=0 ORDER BY horsestats.flatrating DESC LIMIT 20;

But no, there are no records returned.

So what does this one get us (this is the place I started, because it is the first set that my software needs):

Select horsestats.flatrating FROM horsestats  ORDER BY horsestats.flatrating DESC;

I bet your socks you guess wrong. It gets this:

flatrating
0
0
0
0
130
128
127
126
125
124
124

As I said this doesn't happen on any other database or table that I have. I'm going to fix it now by implicitly setting all values of zero to zero, I suspect this will put it right.

Actually, it didn't, if I run:

UPDATE horsestats SET horsestats.flatrating='0' WHERE horsestats.flatrating='0';

The problem remains, so it looks like I have to write that database file off as corrupt. In this case it is ok because I do have to load the majority of the data from elsewhere in a pre-load for the software.

So the question is Why?

Could Sqlite be doing a strange mix of ansi and numeric sort? Its the only thing I can think of to give that order of sort but also the value zero in this table does not seem to be numerically zero, though it behaves as expected once it is passed to my software.

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1 Answer 1

I think your problem is that you're quoting the zero - this is making it a string. make a table like this:

CREATE TABLE [horsestats] (
[horseID] INTEGER  NOT NULL PRIMARY KEY AUTOINCREMENT,
[name] VARCHAR(30)  NULL,
[flatrating] INTEGER DEFAULT 0 NULL
);

and it seems to work. alternatively, run an unquoted version of your update command:

UPDATE horsestats SET horsestats.flatrating=0 WHERE horsestats.flatrating='0';
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