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I have a numerical list:

myList = [1, 2, 3, 100, 5]

Now if I sort this list to obtain [1, 2, 3, 5, 100]. What I want is the indices of the elements from the original list in the sorted order i.e. [0, 1, 2, 4, 3] --- ala MATLAB's sort function that returns both values and indices.

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Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/7851077/… –  kevinarpe Oct 25 '14 at 18:30

5 Answers 5

Something like next:

>>> myList = [1, 2, 3, 100, 5]
>>> [i[0] for i in sorted(enumerate(myList), key=lambda x:x[1])]
[0, 1, 2, 4, 3]

enumerate(myList) gives you a list containing tuples of (index, value):

[(0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3), (3, 100), (4, 5)]

You sort the list by passing it to sorted and specifying a function to extract the sort key (the second element of each tuple; that's what the lambda is for. Finally, the original index of each sorted element is extracted using the [i[0] for i in ...] list comprehension.

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Works perfectly, thanks. –  Gyan Jun 21 '11 at 9:05
2  
you can use itemgetter(1) instead of the lambda function –  John La Rooy Jun 21 '11 at 10:26
2  
@gnibbler is referring to the itemgetter function in the operator module, FYI. So do from operator import itemgetter to use it. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jun 21 '11 at 11:12

If you are using numpy, you have the argsort() function available:

http://docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.argsort.html

This returns the arguments that would sort the array or list.

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In [15]: myList = [1, 2, 3, 100, 5]

In [16]: sorted(range(len(myList)),key=lambda x:myList[x])
Out[16]: [0, 1, 2, 4, 3]

Also:

 sorted(range(len(myList)),key=myList.__getitem__)
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2  
Also works with key=myList.__getitem__ –  John La Rooy Jun 21 '11 at 11:47
1  
that's just nefarious. +1 –  SingleNegationElimination Jun 21 '11 at 21:22

Updated answer with enumerate, which is a more elegant:

sorted(enumerate(a), key=lambda x: x[1])
# [(0, 1), (1, 2), (2, 3), (4, 5), (3, 100)]

Zip the lists together: The first element in the tuple will the index, the second is the value (then sort it using the second value of the tuple x[1], x is the tuple)

Or using itemgetter from the operatormodule`:

from operator import itemgetter
sorted(enumerate(a), key=itemgetter(1))
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Yes, this works too. Thanks. –  Gyan Jun 21 '11 at 9:07
    
enumerate seems more appropriate than zip in this case –  njzk2 May 21 '13 at 12:33

The answers with enumerate are nice, but I personally don't like the lambda used to sort by the value. The following just reverses the index and the value, and sorts that. So it'll first sort by value, then by index.

sorted((e,i) for i,e in enumerate(myList))
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