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This is my hash:

tempData = {"a" => 100, "here" => 200, "c" => "hello"}

I need to access the hash keys as a method like:

tempData.a #100
tempData.here # 200
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What's wrong with the normal accessor? –  Denis Jun 21 '11 at 10:02
    
we can access in the traditional way, I am just curious about this :) –  Sreeraj Jun 21 '11 at 10:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 40 down vote accepted

You could just wrap up your hash in an OpenStruct:

require 'ostruct'
tempData = {"a" => 100, "here" => 200, "c" => "hello"}
os = OpenStruct.new tempData
os.a #=> 100
os.here #=> 200

If you really really wanted to, you could also monkey-patch the Hash class, but I'd advise against that:

class Hash
  def method_missing(m)
    key = m.to_s
    return self[key] if self.has_key? key
    super
  end
end

tempData = {"a" => 100, "here" => 200, "c" => "hello"}
tempData.a #=> 100

Update: In my personal extensions library I added a Hash#to_ostruct method. This will recursively convert a hash into an OpenStruct including all nested hashes.

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Great work..... –  Sreeraj Jun 21 '11 at 10:18
    
I would add that the second solution is fine if you define a new class instead of overwriting the core Hash class. –  Adrien Coquio Jun 21 '11 at 10:18
1  
@AdrienCoquio that is basically what OpenStruct is doing –  T0xicCode Jan 20 '12 at 3:27
    
An interesting post‌​, which does the same thing, but needs to write a small class.. –  rubyprince Mar 16 '12 at 21:40
1  
Thanks for the link. If you read the comments you'll see that the posts' author said that OpenStruct handles all of his initial implementation, but not nested hashes as the version he posted in the comments. –  Michael Kohl Mar 17 '12 at 13:27

Alternatively, if it’s just a small script it might be more convenient to just extend Hash itself

class Hash
  def method_missing sym,*
    fetch(sym){fetch(sym.to_s){super}}
  end
end

method_missing is a magic method that is called whenever your code tries to call a method that does not exist. Ruby will intercept the failing call at run time and let you handle it so your program can recover gracefully. The implementation above tries to access the hash using the method name as a symbol, the using the method name as a string, and eventually fails with Ruby's built-in method missing error.

NB for a more complex script, where adding this behavior might break other third-party gems, you might alternatively use a module and extend each instance

module H
  def method_missing sym,*
    fetch(sym){fetch(sym.to_s){super}}
  end
end

the = { answer: 42 }
the.extend(H)
the.answer # => 42

and for greater convenience you can even propagate the module down to nested hashes

module H
  def method_missing sym,*
    r = fetch(sym){fetch(sym.to_s){super}}
    Hash === r ? r.extend(H) : r
  end
end 

the = { answer: { is: 42 } }
the.extend(H)
the.answer.is # => 42
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