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I'm new to C programming, though experienced with C#. What I'm trying to do it to walk through my char array and replace 'a' with 'x' and print that to the screen. Somehow this doesn't works ... whyever ;)

Using gcc 2.2.4 on Debian 6 64bit

#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
/* A nice long string */
char string[256];
int i;
printf( "Please enter a long string: " );
/* notice stdin being passed in */
fgets ( string, 256, stdin );           

    for( i = 0; i < 256; i++)
    {
            if( string[i] == 'a' )
            {
                    string[i] == 'x';
                    printf("%s", "foo");
            }
    }
  printf( "You entered a very long string, %s", string );
  getchar();
}
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gcc 2.2.4? upgrade your compiler! –  pmg Jun 22 '11 at 10:02
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You have a double equal

if( string[i] == 'a' )
{
    string[i] == 'x'; /* <-- here */

Do it like this:

if( string[i] == 'a' )
{
    string[i] = 'x';
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lol, no comment ^^ gcc should have warned me, hahaha, what a nooby mistake. lol, just, lol. –  NewToCGuy Jun 21 '11 at 11:24
1  
@New: Well it is a valid expression and a problem that isn't very common. You've got it all backwards, most people mess it up in the if condition. :P –  Jeff Mercado Jun 21 '11 at 12:08
    
The compiler really should warn for "no lside", "no side effects" or whatever. –  Lundin Jun 21 '11 at 12:34
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It is string[i]='x', not == 'x'

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As at least one of the comments says: "the compiler should warn about this". I strongly suggest that you make the compiler warn you about this. :) Let me explain.

YMMV for other platforms, but in Unix, you can set the CFLAGS environment variable to including warnings by default when you use the make utility with implicit rules.

The following is a transcript from my bash session where I paste your code into a file, compile with make, and then add optimization to the CFLAGS variable and recompile to see if that gives any more warnings.

503(1)06:22 PM:~ 0> cat >sostr.c
#include <stdio.h>
int main()
{
/* A nice long string */
char string[256];
int i;
printf( "Please enter a long string: " );
/* notice stdin being passed in */
fgets ( string, 256, stdin );

    for( i = 0; i < 256; i++)
    {
            if( string[i] == 'a' )
            {
                    string[i] == 'x';
                    printf("%s", "foo");
            }
    }
  printf( "You entered a very long string, %s", string );
  getchar();
}
504(1)06:22 PM:~ 0> make sostr
cc -g -Wall    sostr.c   -o sostr
sostr.c: In function 'main':
sostr.c:15: warning: statement with no effect
sostr.c:21: warning: control reaches end of non-void function
505(1)06:22 PM:~ 0> export CFLAGS+=' -O2'
506(1)06:23 PM:~ 0> touch sostr.c
507(1)06:23 PM:~ 0> make sostr
cc -g -Wall -O2    sostr.c   -o sostr
sostr.c: In function 'main':
sostr.c:15: warning: statement with no effect
sostr.c:21: warning: control reaches end of non-void function
508(1)06:23 PM:~ 0>

Another tool for getting lots of warnings is splint; although it's often too picky.

509(1)06:33 PM:~ 0> splint sostr.c
Splint 3.1.2 --- 23 Aug 2008

sostr.c: (in function main)
sostr.c:9:1: Return value (type char *) ignored: fgets(string, 25...
  Result returned by function call is not used. If this is intended, can cast
  result to (void) to eliminate message. (Use -retvalother to inhibit warning)
sostr.c:15:21: Statement has no effect: string[i] == 'x'
  Statement has no visible effect --- no values are modified. (Use -noeffect to
  inhibit warning)
sostr.c:20:3: Return value (type int) ignored: getchar()
  Result returned by function call is not used. If this is intended, can cast
  result to (void) to eliminate message. (Use -retvalint to inhibit warning)
sostr.c:21:2: Path with no return in function declared to return int
  There is a path through a function declared to return a value on which there
  is no return statement. This means the execution may fall through without
  returning a meaningful result to the caller. (Use -noret to inhibit warning)

Finished checking --- 4 code warnings
510(1)06:34 PM:~ 1>

So both of these methods catch the same line 15 ==/= problem. Both also warn you that main should return 0; if successful. And splint also complains that you ignore the return values from fgets and getchar. It looks like you really do want to ignore the result of getchar, so I recommend writing (void)getchar(); to show that the value is deliberately ignored. The same is not true for fgets, however. I suggest you make use of the return value or let the warning stand (it's probably fine for this toy code to ignore the value). Checking the return value may be important in other programs, so it's not a wise habit to start marking them (void).

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