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I have a PHP variable that contains a string which represents an XML structure. This string contains ilegal characters that dont let me build a new SimpleXMLElement object from the string. I dont have a way to ask the source of the content to modify their response, so I need to execute some cleaning on this string before I create a SimpleXMLElement object.

I believe the character causing the problem is a � (0x00 (00) HEX) character, and its located within one of the Text Nodes of this string XML.

What is the best way to remove this character or other characters that could break the SimpleXMLElement object.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 22 down vote accepted
$text = str_replace("\0", "", $text);

will replace all null characters in the $text string. You can also supply arrays for the first two arguments, if you want to do multiple replacements.

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depending on the encoding (utf-8), this could remove valid characters –  ax. Mar 13 '09 at 12:40
    
@Johannes Rössel: I added $text= to make code and text match. str_replace does not modify the third argument –  phihag Mar 13 '09 at 12:44
1  
the code only seems to work when i do this: $text = str_replace("�", "", $text); –  Benjamin Ortuzar Mar 13 '09 at 12:54
    
ax: UTF-8 encodes every character < 128 as the character itself, so if you want to get rid of \0, you should delete \0. No side-effects there. UTF-16 is a different matter entirely, though, but still I'd expect languages to work on strings as strings and not byte arrays, so it's a moot point –  Joey Mar 13 '09 at 16:00
1  
The strip_tags function has the effect of removing null characters, but it also removes HTML tags. Sometimes it might be a better option (when you want to remove HTML tags anyway). –  Brilliand Apr 29 '13 at 15:19

trim() will also remove null characters, from either end of the source string (but not within).

$text = trim($text);

I've found this useful for socket server communication, especially when passing JSON around, as a null character causes json_decode() to return null.

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Might be an old answer, but the simplest fix for an issue i was having with a \u0000 in my json debug output (an exception converted to array, array keys contained 0 characters.) :) –  Damien Overeem Mar 29 '13 at 8:39
    
trim solved the problem for me after hours of trying other solutions. thanks! –  Rodniko May 24 '13 at 11:52

While it's probably not the primary target of your question, please have a look at PHP's filter functions: http://www.php.net/manual/en/intro.filter.php

Filter functions validate and sanitize values. Form the PHP site:

$a = 'joe@example.org';
$b = 'bogus - at - example dot org';
$c = '(bogus@example.org)';

$sanitized_a = filter_var($a, FILTER_SANITIZE_EMAIL);
if (filter_var($sanitized_a, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL)) {
    echo "This (a) sanitized email address is considered valid.\n";
}

$sanitized_b = filter_var($b, FILTER_SANITIZE_EMAIL);
if (filter_var($sanitized_b, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL)) {
    echo "This sanitized email address is considered valid.";
} else {
    echo "This (b) sanitized email address is considered invalid.\n";
}

$sanitized_c = filter_var($c, FILTER_SANITIZE_EMAIL);
if (filter_var($sanitized_c, FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL)) {
    echo "This (c) sanitized email address is considered valid.\n";
    echo "Before: $c\n";
    echo "After:  $sanitized_c\n";    
}

Result:

This (a) sanitized email address is considered valid.

This (b) sanitized email address is considered invalid.

This (C) sanitized email address is considered valid.

Before: (bogus@example.org)

After: bogus@example.org

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