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I have several files of data which can contains different types of data. For example i can have a file of : int-int-double :

1,2,0.5
1,3,0.7    

or int-char[16]-double :

1,15c48e7d3a4857bb,0.1
2,49b49e45f46aa45b,0.3

I want to build an object which can be considered as a generic reader. All i want to provide is a boost::tuple type and the object must be able to give me an appropriate regular expression to read a file using fscanf

The basic code for that object would be :

template <typename T>
class reader_t<typename T>
{
  ...
  std::string regexp() const;
}

After that, i will instantiate an object giving the appropriate boost::tuple format.

reader_t reader<boost::tuple<int, int, double> > reader;

To read a file i would use the regexp returned by the method 'regexp' :

std::cout<<reader.regexp()<<std::endl;

In this case, it is supposed to give me:

"%d,%d,%lf\n"

I looked over the boost description but i didn't find what i needed.

Has someone an idea ?

share|improve this question
    
If you're already using boost, can't you use some of boost's magic string tokenization and lexical cast features rather than falling back to scanf? –  Kerrek SB Jun 21 '11 at 12:42
    
How is this magic regex creator supposed to know your second example is int, char[16], double and not int, int(hex encoded), double? Or string, string, string. Do you have that many different formats? –  RedX Jun 21 '11 at 12:46
    
As far as i know, boost string tokenization is really slow. I'm handling one billion lines files ... Maybe i wasn't clear : i specify myself the type (in this case <int, char[16], double>), i don't expect the compiler to guess it. All i need is "given a type, give me the regexp" –  paragooon Jun 21 '11 at 12:51
    
@paragooon: Could you please give a complete, minimal example of what you like to happen? In your current question, there is no mention of any regular expressions or tuples, despite your having "tuple" and "regexp" in the title. –  Kerrek SB Jun 21 '11 at 12:57
    
fscanf? Art thou insane? Use an iostream –  Puppy Jun 21 '11 at 19:22

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

This should get you started:

#include <cstddef>
#include <deque>
#include <string>
#include <sstream>
#include <boost/tuple/tuple.hpp>

namespace details {

struct reader_t_helper
{
    typedef std::deque<std::string const*> accumulator_t;

    template<typename T, int N>
    struct format_accumulator
    {
        static void add(reader_t_helper::accumulator_t& fmts)
        {
            reader_t_helper::format_accumulator_impl<T, N>(fmts);
            reader_t_helper::format_accumulator<T, N - 1>::add(fmts);
        }
    };

    template<typename T>
    struct format_accumulator<T, 0>
    {
        static void add(reader_t_helper::accumulator_t& fmts)
        {
            reader_t_helper::format_accumulator_impl<T, 0>(fmts);
        }
    };

private:
    template<typename T> struct map_dispatcher;

    template<typename T, int N>
    static void format_accumulator_impl(reader_t_helper::accumulator_t& fmts)
    {
        typedef typename boost::tuples::element<N, T>::type elem_t;
        fmts.push_front(reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<elem_t>::map());
    }
};

template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<short>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%hi");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<unsigned short>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%hu");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<int>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%i");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<unsigned>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%u");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<long>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%li");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<unsigned long>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%lu");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<long long>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%lli");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<unsigned long long>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%llu");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<float>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%f");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<double>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%lf");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<long double>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt("%Lf");
        return &fmt;
    }
};
template<std::size_t N> struct reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<char[N]>
{
    static std::string const* map()
    {
        static std::string const fmt(map_dispatcher::init());
        return &fmt;
    }

private:
    static std::string init()
    {
        std::ostringstream oss;
        oss << '%' << N << 'c';
        return oss.str();
    }
};

}

template<typename T>
struct reader_t
{
    std::string format() const
    {
        typedef details::reader_t_helper::accumulator_t fmts_t;
        typedef fmts_t::const_iterator citer_t;
        static int const t_len = boost::tuples::length<T>::value;

        fmts_t fmts;
        details::reader_t_helper::format_accumulator<T, t_len - 1>::add(fmts);

        std::string ret;
        for (citer_t it = fmts.begin(), it_end = fmts.end(); it != it_end;)
        {
            ret += **it;
            ret += ++it != it_end ? ',' : '\n';
        }
        return ret;
    }
};

Add whatever reader_t_helper::map_dispatcher<> specializations you need, as I'm sure I missed some.

Note that if you only need a type list, and not actual values of those types, the implementation could be simplified by using a boost::mpl::vector<T1, T2, ..., Tn> rather than a boost::tuple<T1, T2, ..., Tn>.

Also note that if need be, it would be possible to implement this as a 100% compile-time metafunction through use of boost::mpl::string<>.

EDIT: Added support for char[N]; I missed that requirement the first time around.

share|improve this answer
    
Impressive. Thanks so much for your answer –  paragooon Jun 24 '11 at 6:54

I'm not exactly an expert in this, but how about some C++ template metaprogramming.

Consider this for example:

template<class T> struct x {
    static const char a = '\0';
    static const char b = '\0';
};

template<> struct x<int> {
    static const char a = 'd';
    static const char b = '\0';
};

template<> struct x<double> {
    static const char a = 'l';
    static const char b = 'f';
};

You could use it to create a string like this:

string test;
test = "%" + x<int>::a + x<int>::b + ",";
test += "%" + x<int>::a + x<int>::b + ",";
test += "%" + x<double>::a + x<double>::b;

You might want to find some better names for a,b and x, and might need to figure out how to extract the types from a boost::tuple.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, i was thinking of similar structures but you have pointed out the main issue : be able to extract types from boost::tuple –  paragooon Jun 21 '11 at 15:17
1  
Thanks to boost being a very nice library it isn't that difficult: element<N, T>::type gives you the Nth elements type if T is a tuple type. –  Florian Jun 21 '11 at 15:33

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