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I have the following code for example

$("a.foo").bind(function (e){
    var t;
    if ( $(e.target).is("a") ){
        t = $(e.target);
    }else{
        t = $(e.target).parent("a");

    }
    var data = t.attr("data-info");

});

In english. I might have a list of anchors within which there may be a number of spans. Each anchor is declared as

<a class="foo" href="#" data-info="1">
    <span> ... </span>
    <span> ... </span>
</a>

<a class="foo" href="#" data-info="2">
    <span> ... </span>
    <span> ... </span>
</a>
...
...

I bind a handler to the click event of the anchor but the event object comes back with the anchor OR one of the spans depending on where I click. So to get my html5 "data-info" value into the callback I have to insert a bit of messy code. This is now appearing throughout my code to the point where I am guessing there might be an idiomatic JQuery way of handling this.

EDIT: Backbone snippet showing my real problem ( excuse the coffeescript )

class DashboardView extends Backbone.View

  events:
    "click a.foo": "editLogItem"

  editLogItem: (e)->
    t = $(e.target).closest("a")
share|improve this question
    
I may have just answered my own question. api.jquery.com/closest –  bradgonesurfing Jun 21 '11 at 13:58
    
Yes, that's a useful function, but in this case you don't need it at all. –  Pointy Jun 21 '11 at 14:02
1  
You don't bind it to the click event (ok maybe it binds to all events) You are missing click: $("a.foo").bind('click', function (e){. Your HTML is also wrong, it should be class = "foo" and not class = ".foo". –  Felix Kling Jun 21 '11 at 14:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Example

$(this) will get the element defined by the selector you bind too.

$("a.foo").click(function (e){
    var data = $(this).data("info");
});

You should also use .data rather then .attr("data-...")

Edit:

If this is overwritten you can use e.currentTarget which will have the same value.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree 100% :-) –  Pointy Jun 21 '11 at 14:00
    
Shouldn't it be $("a.foo").bind('click', function (e){ ? –  Felix Kling Jun 21 '11 at 14:08
    
@FelixKling probably. I believe .bind is overloaded to bind to all events. –  Raynos Jun 21 '11 at 14:09
    
If it is they should document that... i don't/didn't know. –  Felix Kling Jun 21 '11 at 14:10
    
@FelixKling it doesn't seem to be. I checked the source. I changed it to .click, thanks! –  Raynos Jun 21 '11 at 14:12

If the handler is attached to the <a> anyway, that'll always be this in the handler, so it doesn't matter what the target was.

$("a.foo").click(function (e){
    var data = $(this).data('info');

    // ...    
});

Note also that to get the value of "data-xxx" attributes you can use the ".data()" function.

share|improve this answer
1  
Shouldn't it be $("a.foo").bind('click', function (e){ ? –  Felix Kling Jun 21 '11 at 14:08
    
Oops yes sorry - I c/p'd from the OP :-) –  Pointy Jun 21 '11 at 14:33
$('a.foo').click(function () {
    var data = $(this).data('info');
});

I'm using the click handler because you specifically mention catching the click event.

share|improve this answer
    
No reason to use ".attr()" to get a "data-" value - use ".data()" instead. –  Pointy Jun 21 '11 at 14:03

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