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I have a large 500x53380 sparse matrix and trying to dichotomize it. I have tried using "event2dichot" under sna package but no success because it requires an adjacency matrix or network object.

I also tried writing a simple algorith like

for ( i in 1:500)
for (j in 1:53380)
if (matrix[i,j]>0) matrix[i,j]=1

this seems to be working but since the matrix is very large, it takes hours at least a few hours so far and it is still computing as I am asking this question for help!

Do u know a better method or hack to accomplish this task?

thanks all.

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+1 I just learned what "dichotomized" means :) –  Prasad Chalasani Jun 21 '11 at 18:53
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4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Although your question is about sparse matrices, it seems to me your code actually describes a standard matrix.

If this is the case, you can process a 500x53380 matrix in seconds. The following code makes use of the fact that a matrix is internally stored in R as a vector. This means you can apply a single vector function over the entire matrix. The caveat is that you have to restore the matrix dimensions afterwards.

Here is an illustration with a much smaller matrix:

mr <- 5
mc <- 8

mat <- matrix(round(rnorm(mr*mc), 3), nrow=mr)
mat

       [,1]   [,2]   [,3]   [,4]   [,5]   [,6]   [,7]   [,8]
[1,] -1.477  1.773  1.630 -0.152  1.054  0.057 -1.260  0.999
[2,] -1.863 -0.312 -0.221 -0.102  0.892 -1.255  0.996 -0.193
[3,] -0.364 -0.059  2.317  1.156  0.893  0.225  0.392 -1.986
[4,] -1.123 -0.661  0.070  0.032  0.019 -1.763 -0.205  0.951
[5,] -0.111 -3.112 -0.970 -0.794 -1.372 -0.119  1.291 -0.680

mydim <- dim(mat)
mat[mat>0] <- 1
mat[mat<0] <- 0
dim(mat) <- mydim
mat

     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8]
[1,]    0    1    1    0    1    1    0    1
[2,]    0    0    0    0    1    0    1    0
[3,]    0    0    1    1    1    1    1    0
[4,]    0    0    1    1    1    0    0    1
[5,]    0    0    0    0    0    0    1    0

Repeating this entire process for a 500x53380 matrix takes ~12 seconds on my machine:

mr <- 500
mc <- 53380

system.time({
  mat <- matrix(round(rnorm(mr*mc), 3), nrow=mr)
  mydim <- dim(mat)
  mat[mat>0] <- 1
  mat[mat<0] <- 0
  dim(mat) <- mydim
})

   user  system elapsed 
  12.25    0.42   12.88 
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+1 same essential idea as me - great minds... –  Gavin Simpson Jun 21 '11 at 15:07
    
this is awesome. I now realize that I just wasted several hours :) I wish I had written here earlier. Thank you. What steps can I take to learn tricks like this, is there any document out there or is this something I have to find out as I move forward? thanks again. –  dave Jun 21 '11 at 15:18
    
@user808562 This is in fact described in the Introduction to R manual cran.r-project.org/doc/manuals/R-intro.html#Index-matrices –  Andrie Jun 21 '11 at 15:23
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Think vectorised, and use just the indices. E.g.:

mat <- matrix(0, nrow = 500, ncol = 53380)
set.seed(7)
fill <- sample(500*53380, 10000)
mat[fill] <- sample(fill, 1:10, replace = TRUE)

one can discretize using:

mat[mat > 0] <- 1

Which is pretty quick on my workstation:

> system.time(mat[mat > 0] <- 1)
   user  system elapsed 
  1.680   0.166   1.875
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wow. this is incredible. thank you. –  dave Jun 21 '11 at 15:16
    
one more simple question, what if I would like to sum each column of the same matrice and put it into a vector. that is to say, if the sum of the elments in the first column is 5 , and second column is 4,...I will end up with a SUM vector of [5,4,..] –  dave Jun 21 '11 at 15:28
    
colSums() would be my first choice. Read ?colSums. –  Gavin Simpson Jun 21 '11 at 15:32
    
@user808562 also, please accept one of the answers if they solved the problem (which at least two appear to have done). Check the tick to the left of each Answer. @Andrie was first with a solution... –  Gavin Simpson Jun 21 '11 at 15:33
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If you use the Matrix package, and the matrix is - say, Mat, then you can operate on Mat@x as a vector. E.g. ix_low <- (Mat@x < threshold), then Mat@x[ix_low] = 0, Mat@x[!ix_low] = 1.

The key is that you're thinking in the wrong way when looking at sparse matrices. A typical representation is (i,j,value).

You're only looking at touching the value vector - don't iterate over anything else.

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thank you, this is great. I cant believe I wasted so many hours in front R screen. It was this easy :) –  dave Jun 21 '11 at 15:18
    
I've been there. I've been there too long. :) –  Iterator Jun 21 '11 at 16:00
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A simple way to do with with a formally defined sparse matrix (i.e. a matrix generated in base 'Matrix' with a capital M instead of the older base 'matrix') is to coerce the matrix to a logical using the as command, then back to a numeric or integer matrix.

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