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I know how to get an intersection of two flat lists:

b1 = [1,2,3,4,5,9,11,15]
b2 = [4,5,6,7,8]
b3 = [val for val in b1 if val in b2]

or

def intersect(a, b):
     return list(set(a) & set(b))

print intersect(b1, b2)

But when I have to find intersection for nested lists then my problems starts:

c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

In the end I would like to receive:

c3 = [[13,32],[7,13,28],[1,6]]

Can you guys give me a hand with this?

Related

share|improve this question
    
I don't have a clear understanding of what the intersection of nested lists would be - why don't you give some example results. –  Douglas Leeder Mar 13 '09 at 13:58
    
What would your intersection be for c1 intersect c2? Do you want to simply find if c1 is in c2? Or do you want to find all elements in c1 that appear anywhere in c2? –  Brian R. Bondy Mar 13 '09 at 13:59
    
Ok. To be more clear, I just added what you ask for. –  elfuego1 Mar 13 '09 at 14:07
    
What is the correct answer for the intersection of the two nested lists? –  S.Lott Mar 13 '09 at 14:14

11 Answers 11

up vote 81 down vote accepted

If you want:

c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]
c3 = [[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1,6]]

Then here is your solution:

c3 = [filter(lambda x: x in c1, sublist) for sublist in c2]

Explanation:

The filter part takes each sublist's item and checks to see if it is in the source list c1. The list comprehension is executed for each sublist in c2.

share|improve this answer
    
Simple and right in the bull's eye. Thank YOU! –  elfuego1 Mar 13 '09 at 14:14
18  
You can use filter(set(c1).__contains__, sublist) for efficiency. btw, the advantage of this solution is that filter() preserves strings and tuples types. –  J.F. Sebastian Mar 14 '09 at 10:46
2  
i like this method, but i'm getting blank '' in my resulting list –  Jonathan Ong Dec 7 '11 at 21:35
2  
@elfuego1 I personally hate the phrase right in the bull's eye. It just sounds too violent and bloody to me. [facepalm] –  mavErick Nov 8 '13 at 16:14
6  
@mavErick: Do you work for PETA by any chance? –  BoltClock Nov 19 '13 at 6:44

You don't need to define intersection. It's already a first-class part of set.

>>> b1 = [1,2,3,4,5,9,11,15]
>>> b2 = [4,5,6,7,8]
>>> set(b1).intersection(b2)
set([4, 5])
share|improve this answer
49  
Just a comment, intersection will take an iterable as an arg, it doesn't need to be a set (although I think it still makes a set behind the scenes), so you can just do: set(b1).intersection(b2). –  TM. Feb 7 '11 at 22:05
    
great answer and great comment here; thanks –  Profane Jul 7 '11 at 15:36
7  
I found stackoverflow.com/a/2541814 solution to be the best –  Leyu May 4 '12 at 13:21
1  
Will this be slower than lambda because of conversion to set? –  Ciro Santilli Mar 26 at 4:33

For people just looking to find the intersection of two lists, the Asker provided two methods:

b1 = [1,2,3,4,5,9,11,15]
b2 = [4,5,6,7,8]
b3 = [val for val in b1 if val in b2]

and

def intersect(a, b):
     return list(set(a) & set(b))

print intersect(b1, b2)

But there is a hybrid method that is more efficient, because you only have to do one conversion between list/set, as opposed to three:

b1 = [1,2,3,4,5]
b2 = [3,4,5,6]
s2 = set(b2)
b3 = [val for val in b1 if val in s2]

This will run in O(n), whereas his original method involving list comprehension will run in O(n^2)

share|improve this answer
    
As "if val in s2" runs in O(N), the proposed code snippet complexity is also O(n^2) –  Romeno Mar 21 '13 at 7:42
1  
The average case of "val in s2" is O(1) according to wiki.python.org/moin/TimeComplexity#set - thus over n operations the expected time is O(n) (whether the worst-case time is O(n) or O(n^2) depends on whether this average case represents an amortized time or not, but this isn't very important in practice). –  D Coetzee Nov 1 '13 at 23:20

Pure list comprehension version

>>> c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
>>> c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]
>>> c1set = frozenset(c1)

Flatten variant:

>>> [n for lst in c2 for n in lst if n in c1set]
[13, 32, 7, 13, 28, 1, 6]

Nested variant:

>>> [[n for n in lst if n in c1set] for lst in c2]
[[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1, 6]]
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for using a set of c1 for lookup. –  Markus Jarderot Mar 13 '09 at 17:10

The functional approach:

input_list = [[1,2,3,4,5],[2,3,4,5,6],[3,4,5,6,7]]

result = reduce(set.intersection,map(set,input_list))

and it can be applied to the more general case of 1+ lists

share|improve this answer
    
to allow empty input list: set(*input_list[:1]).intersection(*input_list[1:]). Iterator version (it = iter(input_list)): reduce(set.intersection, it, set(next(it, []))). Both version doesn't require to convert all input lists to set. The latter is more memory efficient. –  J.F. Sebastian Dec 5 '12 at 6:41

You should flatten using this code ( taken from http://kogs-www.informatik.uni-hamburg.de/~meine/python_tricks ), the code is untested, but I'm pretty sure it works:


def flatten(x):
    """flatten(sequence) -> list

    Returns a single, flat list which contains all elements retrieved
    from the sequence and all recursively contained sub-sequences
    (iterables).

    Examples:
    >>> [1, 2, [3,4], (5,6)]
    [1, 2, [3, 4], (5, 6)]
    >>> flatten([[[1,2,3], (42,None)], [4,5], [6], 7, MyVector(8,9,10)])
    [1, 2, 3, 42, None, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10]"""

    result = []
    for el in x:
        #if isinstance(el, (list, tuple)):
        if hasattr(el, "__iter__") and not isinstance(el, basestring):
            result.extend(flatten(el))
        else:
            result.append(el)
    return result

After you had flattened the list, you perform the intersection in the usual way:


c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

def intersect(a, b):
     return list(set(a) & set(b))

print intersect(flatten(c1), flatten(c2))

share|improve this answer
    
That's a nice bit of flattening code Geo, but it doesn't answer the question. The asker specifically expects the result in the form [[13,32],[7,13,28],[1,6]]. –  Rob Young Jan 13 '11 at 12:58

Do you consider [1,2] to intersect with [1, [2]]? That is, is it only the numbers you care about, or the list structure as well?

If only the numbers, investigate how to "flatten" the lists, then use the set() method.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 And there are already plenty of questions about how to flatten nested lists. –  unbeknown Mar 13 '09 at 13:46
    
I'd like to leave the structure of the lists unchanged. –  elfuego1 Mar 13 '09 at 13:49

Since intersect was defined, a basic list comprehension is enough:

>>> c3 = [intersect(c1, i) for i in c2]
>>> c3
[[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]

Improvement thanks to S. Lott's remark and TM.'s associated remark:

>>> c3 = [list(set(c1).intersection(i)) for i in c2]
>>> c3
[[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]
share|improve this answer

I don't know if I am late in answering your question. After reading your question I came up with a function intersect() that can work on both list and nested list. I used recursion to define this function, it is very intuitive. Hope it is what you are looking for:

def intersect(a, b):
    result=[]
    for i in b:
        if isinstance(i,list):
            result.append(intersect(a,i))
        else:
            if i in a:
                 result.append(i)
    return result

Example:

>>> c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]
>>> c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]
>>> print intersect(c1,c2)
[[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1, 6]]

>>> b1 = [1,2,3,4,5,9,11,15]
>>> b2 = [4,5,6,7,8]
>>> print intersect(b1,b2)
[4, 5]
share|improve this answer
    
Edited to not use 8 space indents. –  quantum Oct 20 '12 at 1:21

Given:

c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]

c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

I find the following code works well and maybe more concise if using set operation:

c3 = [list(set(f)&set(c1)) for f in c2]

It got:

[[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]

If order needed:

c3 = [sorted(list(set(f)&set(c1))) for f in c2]

we got:

[[13, 32], [7, 13, 28], [1, 6]]

By the way, for a more python style, this one is fine too:

c3 = [ [i for i in set(f) if i in c1] for f in c2]

share|improve this answer
c1 = [1, 6, 7, 10, 13, 28, 32, 41, 58, 63]

c2 = [[13, 17, 18, 21, 32], [7, 11, 13, 14, 28], [1, 5, 6, 8, 15, 16]]

c3 = [list(set(c2[i]).intersection(set(c1))) for i in xrange(len(c2))]

c3
->[[32, 13], [28, 13, 7], [1, 6]]
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