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I'm trying to make a client that can send HTTP requests and receive responses from web servers. I tried using Java's HttpURLConnection class but it doesn't give me enough control over what actually gets sent to the server, so I'd like to compose my own HTTP request messages and send them over a Socket. However, reading from the Socket's InputStream is prohibitively slow for some servers, and I'd like to speed that up if possible. Here's some code that I used to test how slow the reads were for the socket as compared to the HttpURLConnection:

public static void useURLConnection() throws Exception
{
    URL url = new URL("http://" + hostName + "/");
    HttpURLConnection conn = (HttpURLConnection) url.openConnection();
    InputStream in = conn.getInputStream();
    byte[] buffer = new byte[buffersize];
    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    while(in.read(buffer) != -1) { }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
}

public static void useSocket() throws Exception
{
    byte[] request = ("GET / HTTP/1.1\r\nHost: " + hostName + "\r\n\r\n").getBytes();
    Socket socket = new Socket(hostName, 80);
    OutputStream out = socket.getOutputStream();
    InputStream in = socket.getInputStream();
    out.write(request);
    byte[] buffer = new byte[buffersize];
    long start = System.currentTimeMillis();
    while(in.read(buffer) != -1) { }
    System.out.println(System.currentTimeMillis() - start);
}

Both methods run in about the same amount of time for some servers, such as www.wikipedia.org, but reading from the socket is much slower -- minutes as opposed to milliseconds -- for others, such as www.google.com. Can someone explain why this is, and perhaps give me some pointers as to what, if anything, I can do to speed up the reads from the socket? Thanks.

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why don't you use existing librairies ? They already have well optimized code, like HTTPClient or AsyncHTTPClient from JF Arcand (you'll find it on github) –  Grooveek Jun 21 '11 at 16:54
1  
HttpURLConnection gives you complete control over what is sent to the server. You can specify the method and any headers you want, and you can override default header values chosen by the library. And, as you have already seen, you don't need to have a detailed knowledge of the underlying protocol to make it work correctly. –  erickson Jun 21 '11 at 17:29
    
@Grooveek I wasn't aware of HTTPClient. I'll look into it. –  Kevin Jun 21 '11 at 17:39
    
@erickson I noticed that I was sometimes getting different HTTP responses based on whether I used HttpURLConnection or the socket. I now realize it's because HttpURLConnection automatically follows redirects by default, but that can be changed. So it does look like HttpURLConnection is the way to go. –  Kevin Jun 21 '11 at 17:45
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1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

So, HTTP/1.1 turns on keepalive by default for client requests. In your socket example, you're sending HTTP/1.1 as your version string, so you're implicitly accepting that you can support keepalive, yet you're completely disregarding it.

Basically, you're blocking trying to read more from the server, despite the fact that the server is waiting for you to do something (either send another request or close the connection.)

You need to either send a header "Connection: close" or send HTTP/1.0 as your version string.

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Thanks! That solved my problem perfectly. –  Kevin Jun 21 '11 at 17:29
    
@Kevin, After Edward's answer, Does this makes the Socket way faster? –  Muhammad Hewedy Jan 9 '12 at 18:20
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