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There is a page: http://renren.com/echo (not real) that will return JSON style data like:

{"candidate":[{"id":251574647,"name":"Jack"}]}  

Now I'm at http://my-server.com and I'd like to do a cross domain Ajax request.
Due to the page at http://renren.com have to be log-in ed to view, I can't use server proxy.
The returned JSON data doesn't have a function call or assignment, so I can't use JSONP.
I doesn't have the right to modify the page at renren.com. What can I do in this condition?

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You don't have control over renren.com, but they approve of 3rd-party access to their data? If so, have you tried appending a ?callback=foo query parameter to the request? I've seen some servers that implicitly support JSON-P when the request has a callback parameter. –  monsur Jun 22 '11 at 18:21
    
I've tried that, there is no callback.. –  wong2 Jun 23 '11 at 4:01
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The technique described by Brian Chess et. al. in the following paper might be of use in this case. In short you override the javascript setter that is used to process the incoming JSON.

https://www.fortify.com/downloads2/public/JavaScript_Hijacking.pdf

When the JSON array arrives on the client, it will be evaluated in the context of the malicious page. In order to witness the evaluation of the JSON, the malicious page has redefined the JavaScript function used to create new objects. In this way, the malicious code has inserted a hook that allows it to get access to the creation of each object and transmit the object's contents back to the malicious site.

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I don't think you can do much without a proxy page or having control of how the data is returned.

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You can use Apache's mod_proxy to perform this request under the guise of your domain. Configure a URL such as http://my-server.com/renren as a proxy for http://renren.com/echo.

When this is complete, you can send your AJAX requests to http://my-server.com/renren and avoid the cross-domain limitation.

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Can this work event if renren.com need authentication(stored in cookie)? –  wong2 Jun 21 '11 at 17:27
    
@wong2: This method will not support cookie-based authentication, because Apache will not use a browser to open the connection to renren.com. However, if other authentication methods are support (token, for example) you will be able to configure mod_proxy as needed. –  George Cummins Jun 21 '11 at 17:29
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If you're on cross-domains, you cannot rely on AJAX. You'd have to use a cURL type of a call through your own PHP/ASP scripts to call for data from another domain's files.

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How about cookies? –  wong2 Jun 22 '11 at 3:48
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