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I read the files of a directory and put each file name into an array (SEARCH) Then I use a loop to go through each file name in the array (SEARCH) and open them up with a while read line loop and read each line into another array (filecount). My problem is its one huge array with 39 lines (each file has 13 lines) and I need it to be 3 seperate arrays, where filecount1[line1] is the first line from the 1st file and so on. here is my code so far...

typeset -A files
for file in ${SEARCH[@]}; do
    while read line; do
        files["$file"]+="$line"
    done < "$file"
done

So, Thanks Ivan for this example! However I'm not sure I follow how this puts it into a seperate array because with this example wouldnt all the arrays still be named "files"?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

line 6 is

$filecount[$linenum]}="$line" 

Seems it is missing a {, right after the $.
Should be:

${filecount[$linenum]}="$line" 

If the above is true, then it is trying to run the output as a command.
Line 6 is (after "fixing" it above):

${filecount[$linenum]}="$line"

However ${filecount[$linenum]} is a value and you can't have an assignment on a value.
Should be:

filecount[$linenum]="$line"

Now I'm confused, as in whether the { is actually missing, or } is the actual typo :S :P


btw, bash supports this syntax too

filecount=$((filecount++)) # no need for $ inside ((..)) and use of increment operator ++

This should work:

typeset -A files
for file in ${SEARCH[@]}; do       # foreach file 
    while read line; do            # read each line
        files["$file"]+="$line"    # and place it in a new array
    done < "$file"                 # reading each line from the current file
done

a small test shows it works

# set up
mkdir -p /tmp/test && cd $_
echo "abc" > a
echo "foo" > b
echo "bar" > c

# read files into arrays
typeset -A files
for file in *; do 
    while read line; do
        files["$file"]+="$line" 
    done < "$file"
done

# print arrays
for file in *; do
    echo ${files["$file"]}
done

# same as:
echo ${files[a]}     # prints: abc
echo ${files[b]}     # prints: foo
echo ${files[c]}     # prints: bar
share|improve this answer
    
I think the original } was a typo ;) but after your suggestion of filecount[$linenum]="$line" it worked! Any ideas on how to make the linenum array "restart" after so many lines have been "written" to filecount? –  Ryan Jun 21 '11 at 17:41
    
Ok now that I've got the loop working without errors, I'm not sure how to access elements in the filecount array with a specific linenum...? –  Ryan Jun 21 '11 at 17:57
    
@Ryan: linenum is not an array and you are using filecount both in array and non-array contexts. You should correct your question to the current version of the code, separate out the two uses of filecount, and then clarify what you you mean by "restart" and "so many lines". However, you are certainly free to undef the array and reset linenum back to 1 to zap the current array contents. –  Seth Robertson Jun 21 '11 at 18:00
    
@Ryan: echo ${filecount[$index]} –  Seth Robertson Jun 21 '11 at 18:00
    
If I understand correctly, Ryan is actually trying to create arrays in a dynamic way. One array per file, where each of those will hold the file's content. This can be done with associative arrays. See this page for more. –  c00kiemon5ter Jun 21 '11 at 18:18

If you're just trying to store the file contents into an array:

declare -A contents
for file in "${!SEARCH[@]}"; do
    contents["$file"]=$(< $file)
done

If you want to store the individual lines in a array, you can create a pseudo-multi-dimensional array:

declare -A contents
for file in "${!SEARCH[@]}"; do
    NR=1
    while read -r line; do
        contents["$file,$NR"]=$line
        (( NR++ ))
    done < "$file"
done

for key in "${!contents[@]}"; do 
    printf "%s\t%s\n" "$key" "${contents["$key"]}"
done
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Glenn, your solution works well but it still puts the files contained in SEARCH[] into one array, contents[] What I'm looking for is a structure that will take every file in SEARCH[], make an array for that file and then put the contents of that file as elements of the file array. So if I have 3 files in SEARCH[] and each file has 5 lines I want to be able to have 3 arrays with 5 distinct elements each... I believe Ivan said it correctly about "dynamically creating arrays" but I still wasnt able to figure out his example... :S –  Ryan Jun 21 '11 at 19:50
    
If you think you really need to do that, you'll have to jump through a lot of hoops with creating variable names and eval. Easy to create an unmaintainable mess that way. –  glenn jackman Jun 21 '11 at 20:21
    
Yea you may be right, I'm trying to think through my logic to see if I can do what I want a different way. thank you everyone for your help. –  Ryan Jun 21 '11 at 20:51

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