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What first seemed easy has now become a bit of a brain teaser.

I'm building one of those "Most Commented" or "Most Emailed" lists that you see in the right sidebar of news/blog websites.

The list has to be relative to a recent date range (say the last 7 days) because you want the list to always to look fresh and contain newer content. Otherwise, the few articles that got tons of comments will always sit atop the list.

For instance, in my case, the website has a few articles that have several hundred comments each but all the rest have less than 20. So if the "Most Commented" list was pulled like this:

select
  ArticleId,
  count(CommentId) as Comments
from
  Comment
group by
  ArticleId
order by
  count(CommentId) desc
limit 10;

Then the few articles with several hundred comments would always be at the top. The list would never change.

So I rewrote the select to include just the last 7 days:

select
  ArticleId,
  count(CommentId) as Comments
from
  Comment
where
  Created >= '2011-06-14'
group by
  ArticleId
order by
  count(CommentId) desc
limit 10;

That looks better, but it still won't work because it doesn't account for situations in which there is no activity in the last 7 days.

If nothing happened (or only a few comments happened) in the last 7 days, the list should contain activity from before that. Bottom line - the list always needs to show 10 articles.

I could always call multiple SQL statements, going back in 7 days increments until I fill the list, but I don't want to do that. I'm caching the results in in-process memory, but I still want to only make one SQL call if at all possible.

Thoughts? I feel like this is easily doable and I'm just overlooking the obvious somewhere.

share|improve this question
    
Can you be more specific on exactly what determines which items make the list and in what order? My guess is that when you nail that down it will be a little more obvious how to approach the problem. I'll put an answer below based off of your idea of going back 7 days at a time, but is that really how you want to do it? –  Tom H. Jun 21 '11 at 17:40
    
This question is very similar and may give you some ideas. –  ErikE Jun 21 '11 at 17:45
    
@Tom H. Articles make the list in the order of the most comments they have, the highest-commented articles at the top. However, I only want to show the last 7 days so extremely-high-commented articles don't sit atop the list forever. But if the last 7 days is empty, I need to show 10 articles from before that. –  sohtimsso1970 Jun 21 '11 at 17:49
1  
Yes, I got that, but it seemed like you weren't sure of what should determine the articles to include if you have to go back beyond those 7 days. Is it the most commented articles from the week before? The most commented of all time? I've added an answer that approaches it as you explain in your paragraph about going back in 7-day increments until you fill the list. –  Tom H. Jun 21 '11 at 18:00
    
@Tom H. Good point. Yes, I want the previous week (and then the week before that and so on) to continue to retain precedence. So time is always a factor. If the current 7 days don't fill the list then the previous 7 should be more valuable than the 7 before that. If that still isn't enough, continue going back. –  sohtimsso1970 Jun 21 '11 at 18:07

6 Answers 6

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Here is another approach that answers your question as written (my previous answer suggests a different approach).

This one will return the top for this week and more from previous weeks if needed to fill the top 10. It works by computing a column that is the number of weeks old the article is and sorts by that and then the number of comments.

The advantage here is that will will always return 10 results (assuming you have more than 10 articles) and will return them sorted by age and comments with the most recent weeks articles at the top and the articles that are one week old next, etc.

select
  ArticleId,
  count(CommentId) as number_of_comments,
  DATEDIFF(CURRENT_DATE, Created) DIV 7 AS weeks_old
from
  Comment
group by
  ArticleId,
  weeks_old
order by
  weeks_old asc,
  number_of_comments desc
limit 10;
share|improve this answer
1  
Ideally the group by clause should include all the columns present in the SELECT statement except the aggregating field(here number_of_comments) –  Arun Kumar Arjunan Jun 21 '11 at 18:27
    
Good catch. I didn't actually test the SQL, so that slipped through. –  Steve Prentice Jun 21 '11 at 18:42
    
Your comment made me think about this a little more. This query (and the rest of the answers like this one) have a problem. An article can be listed twice if it is one of the most active in multiple different weeks and results from both weeks are within the limit 10. –  Steve Prentice Jun 21 '11 at 18:50
    
I think this is the best solution so far because I can't seem to figure out what the best "age weight" should be. That being said, your "weeks old" approach here is slightly wrong. Each week needs to group articles into the same week (1, 2, 3) and not fractional weeks (1.2, 1.21, etc) because the fractional times are ordered so today will always rank higher than yesterday even if yesterday had more comments than today. I fixed that by changing the datediff field to floor(datediff(current_date, created) / 7) –  sohtimsso1970 Jun 21 '11 at 18:51
    
Interesting about the fractional weeks. Most SQL databases perform integer division when using the / operator. I have very little experience with MySQL. Looks like with MySQL you need to use the non-standard DIV operator. –  Steve Prentice Jun 21 '11 at 18:54

I recommend computing a weight for each result and sort by that. For example, your weight could be the number of actions (comments, emails, etc) / age in days. That way, the older the article, the lower its weight unless it has an extremely high action rate.

Something like:

select
  ArticleId,
  count(CommentId) / (1.0 * DATEDIFF(CURRENT_DATE, Created)) AS weight
from
  Comment
group by
  ArticleId
order by
  weight desc
limit 10;

You'll want to play with your weight formula until you get the right mix of newer content with slightly older but active content.

share|improve this answer

I assume you also want to limit to a number of records. Try something like the following: (NOTE: I use MSSQL, so some details/syntax might be incorrect for mysql...sorry!)

select top 10
  ArticleId,
  case when Created>='2011-06-14' then 1 else 0 end as [isNew],
  count(CommentId) as Comments
from
  Comment
group by
  ArticleId,
  case when Created>='2011-06-14' then 1 else 0 end
order by
  isNew desc,
  Comments desc
share|improve this answer

Assuming that you want to keep filling it in by 7 day increments:

SELECT
    C.article_id,
    COUNT(C.comment_id)
FROM
    Comments C
INNER JOIN Numbers N ON
    N.number >= 0 AND
    N.number <=4 AND
    C.created <= CURRENT_DATE - INTERVAL (N.number * 7) DAY AND
    C.created >= CURRENT_DATE - INTERVAL ((N.number + 1) * 7) DAY
GROUP BY
    C.article_id
ORDER BY
    N.number
    COUNT(C.comment_id)
LIMIT 10

I don't work with MySQL, so you may need to play with the syntax, especially with the date functions.

Also, this uses a Numbers table, which is just a table of numeric integers from 1 to whatever. Maybe MySQL has a built-in function for this, otherwise you would need to create or generate the table. It only goes back up to four weeks in this case, so you could even simply use a SELECT 1 UNION ALL SELECT 2...

Finally, since it only goes back four weeks, you could still end up with less than 10 articles. You can increase the number of weeks to something that seems reasonable in your business case.

share|improve this answer

I may be missing something but couldn't you Union what you already have?

I don't know the mySQL syntax so you will have to convert.

select top 10 *
from 
(
select ArticleId, count(CommentId) as Comments 
from  Comment 
where   Created >= '2011-06-14' 
group by   ArticleId 
union
select ArticleId, count(CommentId) as Comments 
from Comment 
group by  ArticleId 
) 
order by comments desc
share|improve this answer
    
this will really only duplicate the last week of records, and not change the order from the simple comment count. –  chezy525 Jun 21 '11 at 18:24
    
I see what you are saying. Maybe that weighted approach by Steve Prentice would be better. –  mikeY Jun 21 '11 at 19:34

This will give you the recently commented articles sorted based on the total comments received by an article.

SELECT ArticleId, COUNT(CommentId) CommentsCount FROM Comment WHERE ArticleID IN
(
select DISTINCT ArticleId FROM Comment ORDER BY Created limit 10
) ORDER BY CommentsCount DESC

Hope that is closer to what you want. If you need the accurate query i.e. include only the last weeks comment in the CommentsCount field, please let me know :-)

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