Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to implement this in C#

I have looked here: http://www.codeproject.com/KB/cpp/PEChecksum.aspx

And am aware of the ImageHlp.dll MapFileAndCheckSum function.

However, for various reasons, I would like to implement this myself.

The best I have found is here: http://forum.sysinternals.com/optional-header-checksum-calculation_topic24214.html

But, I don't understand the explanation. Can anyone clarify how the checksum is calculated?

Thanks!

Update

I from the code example, I do not understand what this means, and how to translate it into C#

sum -= sum < low 16 bits of CheckSum in file // 16-bit borrow 
sum -= low 16 bits of CheckSum in file 
sum -= sum < high 16 bits of CheckSum in file 
sum -= high 16 bits of CheckSum in file 

Update #2

Thanks, came across some Python code that does similar too here

    def generate_checksum(self):

    # This will make sure that the data representing the PE image
    # is updated with any changes that might have been made by
    # assigning values to header fields as those are not automatically
    # updated upon assignment.
    #
    self.__data__ = self.write()

    # Get the offset to the CheckSum field in the OptionalHeader
    #
    checksum_offset = self.OPTIONAL_HEADER.__file_offset__ + 0x40 # 64

    checksum = 0

    # Verify the data is dword-aligned. Add padding if needed
    #
    remainder = len(self.__data__) % 4
    data = self.__data__ + ( '\0' * ((4-remainder) * ( remainder != 0 )) )

    for i in range( len( data ) / 4 ):

        # Skip the checksum field
        #
        if i == checksum_offset / 4:
            continue

        dword = struct.unpack('I', data[ i*4 : i*4+4 ])[0]
        checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffff) + dword + (checksum>>32)
        if checksum > 2**32:
            checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffff) + (checksum >> 32)

    checksum = (checksum & 0xffff) + (checksum >> 16)
    checksum = (checksum) + (checksum >> 16)
    checksum = checksum & 0xffff

    # The length is the one of the original data, not the padded one
    #
    return checksum + len(self.__data__)

However, it's still not working for me - here is my conversion of this code:

using System;
using System.IO;

namespace CheckSumTest
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            var data = File.ReadAllBytes(@"c:\Windows\notepad.exe");

            var PEStart = BitConverter.ToInt32(data, 0x3c);
            var PECoffStart = PEStart + 4;
            var PEOptionalStart = PECoffStart + 20;
            var PECheckSum = PEOptionalStart + 64;
            var checkSumInFile = BitConverter.ToInt32(data, PECheckSum);
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0:x}", checkSumInFile));

            long checksum = 0;

            var remainder = data.Length % 4;
            if (remainder > 0)
            {
                Array.Resize(ref data, data.Length + (4 - remainder));
            }

            var top = Math.Pow(2, 32);

            for (int i = 0; i < data.Length / 4; i++)
            {
                if (i == PECheckSum / 4)
                {
                    continue;
                }
                var dword = BitConverter.ToInt32(data, i * 4);
                checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffff) + dword + (checksum >> 32);
                if (checksum > top)
                {
                    checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffff) + (checksum >> 32);
                }
            }

            checksum = (checksum & 0xffff) + (checksum >> 16);
            checksum = (checksum) + (checksum >> 16);
            checksum = checksum & 0xffff;

            checksum += (uint)data.Length; 
            Console.WriteLine(string.Format("{0:x}", checksum));

            Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

Can anyone tell me where I'm being stupid?

share|improve this question
    
What about the code do you not understand? Example code would be helpful. –  user7116 Jun 21 '11 at 17:59
    
Sorry - editing to make clearer –  Mark Jun 21 '11 at 18:03

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Ok, finally got it working ok... my problem was that I was using ints not uints!!! So, this code works (assuming data is 4-byte aligned, otherwise you'll have to pad it out a little) - and PECheckSum is the position of the CheckSum value within the PE (which is clearly not used when calculating the checksum!!!!)

static uint CalcCheckSum(byte[] data, int PECheckSum)
{
    long checksum = 0;
    var top = Math.Pow(2, 32);

    for (var i = 0; i < data.Length / 4; i++)
    {
        if (i == PECheckSum / 4)
        {
            continue;
        }
        var dword = BitConverter.ToUInt32(data, i * 4);
        checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffff) + dword + (checksum >> 32);
        if (checksum > top)
        {
            checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffff) + (checksum >> 32);
        }
    }

    checksum = (checksum & 0xffff) + (checksum >> 16);
    checksum = (checksum) + (checksum >> 16);
    checksum = checksum & 0xffff;

    checksum += (uint)data.Length;
    return (uint)checksum;

}
share|improve this answer
    
This isn't correct. It doesn't match the ImageHlp.dll MapFileAndCheckSum output. Check out the output using the PE Checksum Executable provided in codeproject.com/Articles/19326/… –  Zuck May 16 at 18:26

The code in the forum post is not strictly the same as what was noted during the actual disassembly of the Windows PE code. The CodeProject article you reference gives the "fold 32-bit value into 16 bits" as:

mov edx,eax    ; EDX = EAX
shr edx,10h    ; EDX = EDX >> 16    EDX is high order
and eax,0FFFFh ; EAX = EAX & 0xFFFF EAX is low order
add eax,edx    ; EAX = EAX + EDX    High Order Folded into Low Order
mov edx,eax    ; EDX = EAX
shr edx,10h    ; EDX = EDX >> 16    EDX is high order
add eax,edx    ; EAX = EAX + EDX    High Order Folded into Low Order
and eax,0FFFFh ; EAX = EAX & 0xFFFF EAX is low order 16 bits  

Which you could translate into C# as:

// given: uint sum = ...;
uint high = sum >> 16; // take high order from sum
sum &= 0xFFFF;         // clear out high order from sum
sum += high;           // fold high order into low order

high = sum >> 16;      // take the new high order of sum
sum += high;           // fold the new high order into sum
sum &= 0xFFFF;         // mask to 16 bits
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks again - have bumped your reply, but marked mine as the answer, as I think it represents the complete algorithm. –  Mark Jun 27 '11 at 13:33
    
@Mark: certainly, I only intended to illustrate the relevant parts of the article. –  user7116 Jun 27 '11 at 15:03

Java code below from emmanuel may not work. In my case it hangs and does not complete. I believe this is due to the heavy use of IO in the code: in particular the data.read()'s. This can be swapped with an array as solution. Where the RandomAccessFile fully or incrementally reads the file into a byte array(s).

I attempted this but the calculation was too slow due to the conditional for the checksum offset to skip the checksum header bytes. I would imagine that the OP's C# solution would have a similar problem.

The below code removes this also.

public static long computeChecksum(RandomAccessFile data, int checksumOffset) throws IOException {

    ...
    byte[] barray = new byte[(int) length];     
    data.readFully(barray);

    long i = 0;
    long ch1, ch2, ch3, ch4, dword;

    while (i < checksumOffset) {

        ch1 = ((int) barray[(int) i++]) & 0xff;
        ...

        checksum += dword = ch1 | (ch2 << 8) | (ch3 << 16) | (ch4 << 24);

        if (checksum > top) {
            checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffffL) + (checksum >> 32);
        }
    }
    i += 4;

    while (i < length) {

        ch1 = ((int) barray[(int) i++]) & 0xff;
        ...

        checksum += dword = ch1 | (ch2 << 8) | (ch3 << 16) | (ch4 << 24);

        if (checksum > top) {
            checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffffL) + (checksum >> 32);
        }
    }

    checksum = (checksum & 0xffff) + (checksum >> 16);
    checksum = checksum + (checksum >> 16);
    checksum = checksum & 0xffff;
    checksum += length;

    return checksum;
}

I still however think that code was too verbose and clunky so I swapped out the raf with a channel and rewrote the culprit bytes to zero's to eliminate the conditional. This code could still probably do with a cache style buffered read.

public static long computeChecksum2(FileChannel ch, int checksumOffset)
            throws IOException {

    ch.position(0);
    long sum = 0;
    long top = (long) Math.pow(2, 32);
    long length = ch.size();

    ByteBuffer buffer = ByteBuffer.wrap(new byte[(int) length]);
    buffer.order(ByteOrder.LITTLE_ENDIAN);

    ch.read(buffer);
    buffer.putInt(checksumOffset, 0x0000);

    buffer.position(0);
    while (buffer.hasRemaining()) {
        sum += buffer.getInt() & 0xffffffffL;
        if (sum > top) {
            sum = (sum & 0xffffffffL) + (sum >> 32);
        }
    }   
    sum = (sum & 0xffff) + (sum >> 16);
    sum = sum + (sum >> 16);
    sum = sum & 0xffff;
    sum += length;

    return sum;
}
share|improve this answer

I was trying to solve the same issue in Java. Here is Mark's solution translated into Java, using a RandomAccessFile instead of a byte array as input:

static long computeChecksum(RandomAccessFile data, long checksumOffset) throws IOException {
    long checksum = 0;
    long top = (long) Math.pow(2, 32);
    long length = data.length();

    for (long i = 0; i < length / 4; i++) {
        if (i == checksumOffset / 4) {
            data.skipBytes(4);
            continue;
        }

        long ch1 = data.read();
        long ch2 = data.read();
        long ch3 = data.read();
        long ch4 = data.read();

        long dword = ch1 + (ch2 << 8) + (ch3 << 16) + (ch4 << 24);

        checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffffL) + dword + (checksum >> 32);

        if (checksum > top) {
            checksum = (checksum & 0xffffffffL) + (checksum >> 32);
        }
    }

    checksum = (checksum & 0xffff) + (checksum >> 16);
    checksum = checksum + (checksum >> 16);
    checksum = checksum & 0xffff;
    checksum += length;

    return checksum;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.