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I'm using this:

4.times { |i| assert_not_equal("content#{i + 2}".constantize, object.first_content) }

and i have previously declared local variables

content1
content2
content3
content4
content5

the error I get

NameError: wrong constant name content2

Whot does this error mean? I'm pretty sure that I want content2 =\

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You have to call ruby constants with a big letter:

Content2 instead of content2.

A constant name starts with an uppercase letter followed by name characters. Class names and module names are constants, and follow the constant naming conventions. By convention, constant variables are normally spelled using uppercase letters and underscores throughout.

Link

It should be noted though that there is no such thing as constant variables, but constant values.

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interesting. is there a similar method to .that keeps casing? constantize –  NullVoxPopuli Jun 21 '11 at 18:18
    
Sorry for the deletion of comments, I kept misunderstanding your question –  Yet Another Geek Jun 21 '11 at 18:23
    
like... right now it is capitalizing the string I give it. so, currently, .constantize turns "hello" into Hello. Is there anything that will turn "hello" into hello. (preserves case) –  NullVoxPopuli Jun 21 '11 at 18:25
    
If you want the value of the variable you can just use eval (but be careful of course) –  Yet Another Geek Jun 21 '11 at 18:30

Can you please user eval("content#{i + 2}")

Note that eval is dangerous though :-)

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why is eval dangerous? –  NullVoxPopuli Jun 21 '11 at 19:42
    
When using eval we might do something like this: eval(user.name). If the user has entered "system('rm -rf /')" we might end up in removing the filesystem. –  Arun Kumar Arjunan Jun 22 '11 at 2:08
    
oh dear. wouldn't the system ask for permission before running that command? –  NullVoxPopuli Jun 22 '11 at 12:43
1  
What if user.name returns User.destroy_all :-) –  Arun Kumar Arjunan Jun 23 '11 at 8:17

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