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I'm trying to set up a Gradle build script for a new project. That project will use JPA 2 along with Querydsl.

On the following page of Querydsl's reference documentation, they explain how to set up their JPAAnnotationProcessor (apt) for Maven and Ant.

I would like to do the same with Gradle, but I don't know how and my beloved friend did not help me much on this one. I need to find a way to invoke Javac (preferably without any additional dependencies) with arguments to be able to specify the processor that apt should use (?)

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6 Answers 6

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I did not test it but this should work:

repositories {
    mavenCentral()
}
apply plugin: 'java'
dependencies {
   compile(group: 'com.mysema.querydsl', name: 'querydsl-apt', version: '1.8.4')
   compile(group: 'com.mysema.querydsl', name: 'querydsl-jpa', version: '1.8.4')
   compile(group: 'org.slf4j', name: 'slf4j-log4j12', version: '1.6.1')
}

compileJava {
    doFirst {
        Map otherArgs = [
            includeAntRuntime: false,
            destdir: destinationDir,
            classpath: configurations.compile.asPath,
            sourcepath: '',
            target: targetCompatibility,
            source: sourceCompatibility
        ]
        options.compilerArgs = [
            '-processor', 'com.mysema.query.apt.jpa.JPAAnnotationProcessor',
            '-s', "${destinationDir.absolutePath}".toString()
        ]
        Map antOptions = otherArgs + options.optionMap()
        ant.javac(antOptions) {
            source.addToAntBuilder(ant, 'src', FileCollection.AntType.MatchingTask)
            options.compilerArgs.each {value ->
                compilerarg(value: value)
            }
        }
    }
}

Hope it helps.

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Doesn't your solution add a dependency to ant in the build? I would like to avoid that if possible –  dSebastien Jun 23 '11 at 7:33
    
Anyhow, works great, thanks a lot! –  dSebastien Jun 23 '11 at 12:23
1  
Ant is how Gradle builds. It's in Gradle core so no dependencies needed. Happy to know it worked. –  Fred Simon Jun 23 '11 at 17:25
    
Good to know, that'll teach me to RTFM before I comment ;-) Thanks again. –  dSebastien Jun 23 '11 at 19:51
    
gradle is ant, but in groovy instead of xml. –  MariuszS Jan 21 at 7:59

While I have no problem with the use gradle makes of Ant, I agree with the original poster that it is undesirable in this case. I found a github project by Tom Anderson here that describes what I believe is a better approach. I modified it a small amount to fit my needs (output to src/main/generated) so that it looks like:

sourceSets {
     generated
}

sourceSets.generated.java.srcDirs = ['src/main/generated']

configurations {
     querydslapt
}

dependencies {     
    compile 'mine go here'
    querydslapt 'com.mysema.querydsl:querydsl-apt:2.7.1'
}

task generateQueryDSL(type: Compile, group: 'build', description: 'Generates the QueryDSL query types') {
         source = sourceSets.main.java
         classpath = configurations.compile + configurations.querydslapt
         options.compilerArgs = [
                "-proc:only",
                "-processor", "com.mysema.query.apt.jpa.JPAAnnotationProcessor"
         ]
         destinationDir = sourceSets.generated.java.srcDirs.iterator().next()
}
compileJava.dependsOn generateQueryDSL

This approach makes a lot more sense to me than the other, if it does to you too, then you have another option for querydsl generation.

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thank you Joeg: I like the approach of keeping separated the source code generation step and the code compilation step :) –  pbanfi Mar 12 '13 at 16:56

This guy's gist worked for me: https://gist.github.com/EdwardBeckett/5377401

sourceSets {
    generated {
        java {
            srcDirs = ['src/main/generated']
        }
    }
}

configurations {
    querydslapt
}

dependencies {
    compile 'org.hibernate.javax.persistence:hibernate-jpa-2.0-api:1.0.1.Final'
    compile "com.mysema.querydsl:querydsl-jpa:$querydslVersion"
    querydslapt "com.mysema.querydsl:querydsl-apt:$querydslVersion"
}

task generateQueryDSL(type: JavaCompile, group: 'build', description: 'Generates the QueryDSL query types') {
    source = sourceSets.main.java
    classpath = configurations.compile + configurations.querydslapt
    options.compilerArgs = [
            "-proc:only",
            "-processor", "com.mysema.query.apt.jpa.JPAAnnotationProcessor"
    ]
    destinationDir = sourceSets.generated.java.srcDirs.iterator().next()
}

compileJava {
    dependsOn generateQueryDSL
    source generateQueryDSL.destinationDir
}

compileGeneratedJava {
    dependsOn generateQueryDSL
    options.warnings = false
    classpath += sourceSets.main.runtimeClasspath
}

clean {
    delete sourceSets.generated.java.srcDirs
}

idea {
    module {
        sourceDirs += file('src/main/generated')
    }
}
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Thank you @Ryan. This is too helpful to me! –  xyzlast Oct 31 '13 at 7:15
    
I'm using Gradle 1.10 and this worked like a charm! Thanks @Ryan. –  Yohan Liyanage Jun 19 '14 at 15:33
    
Glad it helped @Yohan Liyanage –  Ryan Jun 20 '14 at 21:53

With Gradle 1.3 and newer (older not tested) you can use Querydsl APT like this:

configurations {
  javacApt
}
dependencies {
  javacApt 'com.mysema.querydsl:querydsl-apt:3.3.0'
}
compileJava {
  options.compilerArgs <<
    '-processorpath' << (configurations.compile + configurations.javacApt).asPath <<
    '-processor' << 'com.mysema.query.apt.jpa.JPAAnnotationProcessor'
}

These compiler args are passed directly to javac.

To use with groovy compiler replace compileJava with compileGroovy.

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1  
Hi Pavel! I tried the solution you're suggesting for my entities (which are written in groovy) but it would not work. It would work, however, if anything was in groovy but the entities. I posted a solution as comment to a similar question for cases where you want @Entity classes written in Groovy to be picked up by the querydsl generator here –  Konstantinos Filios Dec 22 '14 at 16:03

The Querydsl Ant example should work pretty much as is when you take all the XML out. So it ends up being something like this:

javac -sourcepath ${src} -cp ${cp} -proc:only -processor com.mysema.query.apt.jpa.JPAAnnotationProcessor -s ${generated}

src, cp and generated you will probably be able to extract from Gradle.

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Here is simple setup that works and integrates seamlessly with netbeans. Javac will basicly do all the job needed without much intervention. The rest are small treaks that will make it work with IDEs like Netbeans.

apply plugin:'java'

dependencies {
    // Compile-time dependencies should contain annotation processors
    compile(group: 'com.mysema.querydsl', name: 'querydsl-apt', version: '1.8.4')
    compile(group: 'com.mysema.querydsl', name: 'querydsl-jpa', version: '1.8.4')
    compile(group: 'org.slf4j', name: 'slf4j-log4j12', version: '1.6.1')
}

ext {
    generatedSourcesDir = file("${buildDir}/generated-sources/javac/main/java")
}

// This section is the key to IDE integration.
// IDE will look for source files in both in both
//
//  * src/main/java
//  * build/generated-sources/javac/main/java
//
sourceSets {
    main {
        java {
            srcDir 'src/main/java'
            srcDir generatedSourcesDir
        }
    }
}

// These are the only modifications to build process that are required.
compileJava {
    doFirst {
        // Directory should exists before compilation started.
        generatedSourcesDir.mkdirs()
    }
    options.compilerArgs += ['-s', generatedSourcesDir]
}

And that's it. Javac will make the rest of the job.

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