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I'm trying to figure out how i can fix this becasue the post parameters of the form are: answer1[2], and answer2[4]. The number inside the brackets represent the id of the question it belongs to. Reason I need to know how to do this is because its not returning an error for the answers when its an empty form submission.

if((empty($_POST['answer1'])) || (trim($_POST['answer1'])=="") || ($_POST['answer1'] == NULL) || (!isset($_POST['answer1']))){$errors = "yes";}
if((empty($_POST['answer2'])) || (trim($_POST['answer2'])=="") || ($_POST['answer2'] == NULL) || (!isset($_POST['answer2']))){$errors = "yes";}

// Error checking, make sure all form fields have input
if ($errors == "yes") {

    // Not all fields were entered error
    $message = "You must enter values to all of the form fields!";

    $output = array('errorsExist' => true, 'message' => $message);

}
share|improve this question
    
get away from using flags like yes and no and use true/false as it was designed, then you would reduce your if() fn to this: if($errors) (this means if $errors are TRUE, no need to do a comparison or == check). –  Jakub Aug 16 '11 at 5:49

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You wrote that you have problems to understand what is going on. So let's check one of the if-clauses in depth:

if((empty($_POST['answer1'])) || (trim($_POST['answer1'])=="") || ($_POST['answer1'] == NULL) || (!isset($_POST['answer1']))) { ...

This can be much simpler written as:

if (empty($_POST['answer1']) || trim($_POST['answer1'])=="") { ...

That's because NULL values are empty() and !isset(...) values are empty as well. You had already checked that in the first, so no need to check it again.

Then there is no need to add brackets around everything. Add them only when actual needed, to make your code easier to read.

Let's change the code based on that:

if (empty($_POST['answer1']) || trim($_POST['answer1'])=="") {$errors = "yes";}
if (empty($_POST['answer2']) || trim($_POST['answer2'])=="") {$errors = "yes";}

// Error checking, make sure all form fields have input
if ($errors == "yes") {

Next part is the $errors variable. There is no need to make it say yes and no, while your mean true or false. Next to that, the variable should be initialized for the case that everything went through ok. Let's change the code a bit more:

$errors = false;
if (empty($_POST['answer1']) || trim($_POST['answer1'])=="") {$errors = true;}
if (empty($_POST['answer2']) || trim($_POST['answer2'])=="") {$errors = true;}

// Error checking, make sure all form fields have input
if ($errors) {    
    // Not all fields were entered error
    $message = "You must enter values to all of the form fields!";

    $output = array('errorsExist' => true, 'message' => $message);

}

So now the code looks a bit better to find your actual error. To find the error, you need to inspect which values are actually submitted to your form:

echo '<pre>', htmlspecialchars(print_r($_POST, true)), '</pre>'; die();

Request the page again and you will see which data you have submitted so you can check whether or not you error-check the right fields.

Another method is to expect that all submissions have errors. So the default would be true. Then only if all fields do validate, $errors is set to false.

So in your case, if you do not do the right error-checking your response will always return no errors, even the form in practice has. That's why you should control if your error checks are actually working.


According to your feedback in comment, it's clear that you need to reference the item inside the answer1 and answer2 post field. You just have checked the wrong field.

So just replace $_POST['answer1'] with $_POST['answer1'][2] and the same for the other answer. This is the example if clause for answer1:

if (empty($_POST['answer1'][2]) || trim($_POST['answer1'][2])=="") { ...
                           ^^^                           ^^^

Just always test the right variables and it should work like expected.

Related: How do I create a server-side form submission script that has client-side characteristics?

share|improve this answer
    
Here's what I got. <pre>Array ( [answer1] =&gt; Array ( [2] =&gt; ) [answer2] =&gt; Array ( [4] =&gt; ) [userID] =&gt; 10001 [submit] =&gt; Enter ) </pre> –  Jeff Davidson Jun 21 '11 at 20:18
1  
@Jeff: Okay, you check the wrong variables. I've added more info to the answer. –  hakre Jun 21 '11 at 20:24
    
But the only thing different is that the number inside the brackets aren't going to known. The questionID is going to be different from answer to answer for each user. –  Jeff Davidson Jun 21 '11 at 20:29
1  
Then make it a variable and put the right number into the variable. –  hakre Jun 21 '11 at 20:32
1  
a $i varable, not a constant like i - Jeff I leave this as a practice to. You just need to check the right variables, and other variables will help you to access them. –  hakre Jun 21 '11 at 20:39

not too sure on how variables are scoped in PHP but my guess is you should define $errors just before you do the first IF. Also, I don't think this much checking is necessary, the if(empty($_POST[...])) will suffice.

share|improve this answer

Guy, you just need to do this. You have redundant code. Please DRY (don't repeat yourself)

<?
    if (empty($_POST['answer1']) || empty($_POST['answer2']))
        $errors = "yes"

    if ($errors == "yes") 
    {        
        $message = "You must enter values to all of the form fields!";
        $output = array('errorsExist' => true, 'message' => $message);

    }
?>
share|improve this answer
    
That would only apply for the first answer though. You left out answer2. –  Jeff Davidson Jun 21 '11 at 19:59
1  
@Jeff: That's left as practice to you. –  hakre Jun 21 '11 at 20:10
1  
@Jeff: sorry about that. I made the revision. But I think, you need to play around more with PHP. Just experiment man. It's much less effort for you to experiment then going through the process on stack overflow. It's probably costing you quite a bit of time, and it doesn't seem as efficient. –  FinalForm Jun 21 '11 at 20:25
if(!@$_POST['answer1']) $errors = "yes";
share|improve this answer
1  
Why -1? try it and give me the problem. –  user809145 Jun 21 '11 at 19:57
    
Yuck. Avoid the @ error suppression operator. That's kind of a cheap shortcut, and you can miss unexpected, actually important errors. (-1 didn't come from me, btw) –  Wiseguy Jun 21 '11 at 19:58
1  
Why would you suggest error suppression over empty() ? There are really very few cases where using error suppression in PHP is a good idea, and this is not one of them. –  Tim Fountain Jun 21 '11 at 19:59
    
Might be helpful: stackoverflow.com/questions/136899/… –  Wiseguy Jun 21 '11 at 20:02

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