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Is there a built in .NET function or an easy way to convert from:

"01234"

to:

"\u2070\u00B9\u00B2\u00B3\u2074"

Note that superscript 1, 2 and 3 are not in the range \u2070-\u209F but \u0080-\u00FF.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 14 down vote accepted

EDIT: I hadn't noticed that the superscript characters weren't as simple as \u2070-\u2079. You probably want to set up a mapping between characters. If you only need digits, you could just index into a string fairly easily:

const string SuperscriptDigits = 
    "\u2070\u00b9\u00b2\u00b3\u2074\u2075\u2076\u2077\u2078\u2079";

Then using LINQ:

string superscript = new string(text.Select(x => SuperscriptDigits[x - '0'])
                                    .ToArray());

Or without:

char[] chars = text.ToArray();
for (int i = 0; i < chars.Length; i++)
{
    chars[i] = SuperscriptDigits[chars[i] - '0'];
}
string superscript = new string(chars);
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The codepoints for superscript 1-3 are somewhere else: unicode.org/charts/PDF/U2070.pdf –  dtb Jun 21 '11 at 20:33
    
@dtb: Gah. Okay, fixing. –  Jon Skeet Jun 21 '11 at 20:34
    
I think it would be easier using String.Concat() instead of the string constructor with the LINQ approach. That is unless there's a significant performance difference between the two. –  Jeff Mercado Jun 21 '11 at 20:46
    
@Jeff: I don't see how that would be easier. –  Jon Skeet Jun 21 '11 at 20:50
1  
@Jeff: I can see a Concat<IEnumerable<T>> and a Concat<IEnumerable<string>> call, but not Concat<IEnumerable<char>>. I suspect the former would call ToString on each element, which would create a bunch of strings unnecessarily. Also, these calls are only available in .NET 4, whereas my approach would also work in .NET 3.5. I think I'd rather stick with ToArray and the constructor :) –  Jon Skeet Jun 21 '11 at 20:54

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