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Here is an example

JPanel panel = new JPanel(){
    @Override
    protected void paintComponent(Graphics g){
        // do stuff
    }

    @Override
    public Dimension getPreferredSize(){
        // do stuff
    }
};

Would this just be a variation of an anonymous inner class, or is it something else entirely?

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Why a "variation"? –  Garrett Hall Jun 21 '11 at 22:08
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3 Answers

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Yes that is an anonymous inner class

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@Nathan, what does the term "anonymous" mean? –  mre Jun 21 '11 at 22:02
1  
@mre: it's not given a name: you don't have to say class MyClass extends JPanel and then instantiate MyClass using its name. –  Bruno Jun 21 '11 at 22:04
    
@mre well you are instantiating a new class that you are defining without a name –  Nathan Romano Jun 21 '11 at 22:04
    
@mre essentially it means that the class is unnamed. What you have here is an anonymous inner class specifically: download.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/javaOO/… –  Stephen Rudolph Jun 21 '11 at 22:06
    
@Bruno, @Nathan, thanks. to me, the term is confusing, especially when it doesn't appear "anonymous" to me. :) –  mre Jun 21 '11 at 22:06
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You may be confused about the anonymity of the class because at first blush it looks like you're defining panel to be an instance of JPanel. However, that's not what you are doing. Instead you are defining a sub-class of JPanel, which is a new class and creating panel to be an instance of this new sub-class. What is the name of this new class? Well, it doesn't have one and hence that's what makes it anonymous!

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That is an anonymous inner class.

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