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I'd like to be able to dump a dictionary containing long strings that I'd like to have in the block style for readability. For example:

foo: |
  this is a
  block literal
bar: >
  this is a
  folded block

PyYAML supports the loading of documents with this style but I can't seem to find a way to dump documents this way. Am I missing something?

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2 Answers

up vote 10 down vote accepted
import yaml

class folded_unicode(unicode): pass
class literal_unicode(unicode): pass

def folded_unicode_representer(dumper, data):
    return dumper.represent_scalar(u'tag:yaml.org,2002:str', data, style='>')
def literal_unicode_representer(dumper, data):
    return dumper.represent_scalar(u'tag:yaml.org,2002:str', data, style='|')

yaml.add_representer(folded_unicode, folded_unicode_representer)
yaml.add_representer(literal_unicode, literal_unicode_representer)

data = {
    'literal':literal_unicode(
        u'by hjw              ___\n'
         '   __              /.-.\\\n'
         '  /  )_____________\\\\  Y\n'
         ' /_ /=== == === === =\\ _\\_\n'
         '( /)=== == === === == Y   \\\n'
         ' `-------------------(  o  )\n'
         '                      \\___/\n'),
    'folded': folded_unicode(
        u'It removes all ordinary curses from all equipped items. '
        'Heavy or permanent curses are unaffected.\n')}

print yaml.dump(data)

The result:

folded: >
  It removes all ordinary curses from all equipped items. Heavy or permanent curses
  are unaffected.
literal: |
  by hjw              ___
     __              /.-.\
    /  )_____________\\  Y
   /_ /=== == === === =\ _\_
  ( /)=== == === === == Y   \
   `-------------------(  o  )
                        \___/

For completeness, one should also have str implementations, but I'm going to be lazy :-)

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pyyaml does support dumping literal or folded blocks.

Using Representer.add_representer

defining types:

class folded_str(str): pass

class literal_str(str): pass

class folded_unicode(unicode): pass

class literal_unicode(str): pass

Then you can define the representers for those types. Please note that while Gary's solution works great for unicode, you may need some more work to get strings to work right (see implementation of represent_str).

def change_style(style, representer):
    def new_representer(dumper, data):
        scalar = representer(dumper, data)
        scalar.style = style
        return scalar
    return new_representer

import yaml
from yaml.representer import SafeRepresenter

# represent_str does handle some corner cases, so use that
# instead of calling represent_scalar directly
represent_folded_str = change_style('>', SafeRepresenter.represent_str)
represent_literal_str = change_style('|', SafeRepresenter.represent_str)
represent_folded_unicode = change_style('>', SafeRepresenter.represent_unicode)
represent_literal_unicode = change_style('|', SafeRepresenter.represent_unicode)

Then you can add those representers to the default dumper:

yaml.add_representer(folded_str, represent_folded_str)
yaml.add_representer(literal_str, represent_literal_str)
yaml.add_representer(folded_unicode, represent_folded_unicode)
yaml.add_representer(literal_unicode, represent_literal_unicode)

... and test it:

data = {
    'foo': literal_str('this is a\nblock literal'),
    'bar': folded_unicode('this is a folded block'),
}

print yaml.dump(data)

result:

bar: >-
  this is a folded block
foo: |-
  this is a
  block literal

Using default_style

If you are interested in having all your strings follow a default style, you can also use the default_style keyword argument, e.g:

>>> data = { 'foo': 'line1\nline2\nline3' }
>>> print yaml.dump(data, default_style='|')
"foo": |-
  line1
  line2
  line3

or for folded literals:

>>> print yaml.dump(data, default_style='>')
"foo": >-
  line1

  line2

  line3

or for double-quoted literals:

>>> print yaml.dump(data, default_style='"')
"foo": "line1\nline2\nline3"

Caveats:

Here is an example of something you may not expect:

data = {
    'foo': literal_str('this is a\nblock literal'),
    'bar': folded_unicode('this is a folded block'),
    'non-printable': literal_unicode('this has a \t tab in it'),
    'leading': literal_unicode('   with leading white spaces'),
    'trailing': literal_unicode('with trailing white spaces  '),
}
print yaml.dump(data)

results in:

bar: >-
  this is a folded block
foo: |-
  this is a
  block literal
leading: |2-
     with leading white spaces
non-printable: "this has a \t tab in it"
trailing: "with trailing white spaces  "

1) non-printable characters

See the YAML spec for escaped characters (Section 5.7):

Note that escape sequences are only interpreted in double-quoted scalars. In all other scalar styles, the “\” character has no special meaning and non-printable characters are not available.

If you want to preserve non-printable characters (e.g. TAB), you need to use double-quoted scalars. If you are able to dump a scalar with literal style, and there is a non-printable character (e.g. TAB) in there, your YAML dumper is non-compliant.

E.g. pyyaml detects the non-printable character \t and uses the double-quoted style even though a default style is specified:

>>> data = { 'foo': 'line1\nline2\n\tline3' }
>>> print yaml.dump(data, default_style='"')
"foo": "line1\nline2\n\tline3"

>>> print yaml.dump(data, default_style='>')
"foo": "line1\nline2\n\tline3"

>>> print yaml.dump(data, default_style='|')
"foo": "line1\nline2\n\tline3"

2) leading and trailing white spaces

Another bit of useful information in the spec is:

All leading and trailing white space characters are excluded from the content

This means that if your string does have leading or trailing white space, these would not be preserved in scalar styles other than double-quoted. As a consequence, pyyaml tries to detect what is in your scalar and may force the double-quoted style.

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