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I just started with c++ and I have some issues making a template class called auto_map that uses std::map which has to store not the objects but the pointers of them.

Something like:

std::map<K*, V*, cmp> m;

That I use like this:

auto_map<std::string, std::string> t;
t.insert( new std::string( "A" ), new std::string( "B" ) );

cpm is:

struct cmp
{
  bool operator()(K *a, K *b) { return *a < *b; }
  bool operator== (K *a) { return (*a); }
};

The insert function searches for any duplicates before inserting:

void insert(K* k, V* v)
{
  for (typename std::map<K*, V*, cmp>::iterator i=m.begin(); i!=m.end(); ++i)
  {
    if ( (*k) == (*(*i).first) ) 
    {
      delete (*i).first;
      delete (*i).second;
      m.erase(i);
    }          
  }
  m.insert(std::make_pair(k,v));
}

And the constructors:

auto_map(){}
~auto_map()
{
  for (typename std::map<K*, V*, cmp>::iterator i=m.begin(); i!=m.end(); ++i)
  { 
    delete (*i).first;
    delete (*i).second;
    m.erase(i);
  }
}

These are working fine, but now you probably get the idea. So here comes the question, that I am not so sure about:

How do I write the copy-constructor for it?

auto_map (auto_map& original)
{
  for (typename std::map<K*, V*, cmp>::iterator i=original.m.begin(); i!=original.m.end(); ++i)
  {

    // what goes in here that will call each objects copy-constructor?
    // how not to get complained about invalid conversions?... 

    // K newk = (*(*i).first);
    // V newv = (*(*i).second);
    // m.insert(std::make_pair(newk, newv));
    // gives compiler error: cannot convert ‘const CntInteger’ to ‘CntInteger* const’ in initialization
    // cannot convert ‘const CntInteger’ to ‘CntInteger*’ in initialization


  }
};

Thanks a lot for the answers and corrections!

share|improve this question
    
Why do you have that loop in your default constructor? Surely m will be empty? –  Oliver Charlesworth Jun 21 '11 at 22:24
    
What I wonder is why he would want to do this? If you are going to have deep copy semantics, just use objects, not pointers to objects. You'll have just as many copy constructors and copy operations as the regular way. You won't have to worry that you've made some critical mistake in layering std::map. And it'll likely be faster due to not having to allocate as many objects. Allocating a std::pair of objects is one allocation. Allocating a std::pair of pointers is one alloc for the std::pair, and one each for the members. –  Nicol Bolas Jun 21 '11 at 22:45
    
What's your real use case here? std::string is already memory-managed, and if you're worried about the speed, you could just use an std::unordered_map<std::string, T>. Would that be an option? –  Kerrek SB Jun 21 '11 at 22:48
    
Oli: The loop is in the destructor, to clean up. Nicol, Kerrek: Good points, I see no real use case either, but this is the task, so it has to be done this way. –  daralthus Jun 22 '11 at 1:14
    
I created a gist for the task and my current implementation: gist.github.com/1039341 A map has to store both the keys and values as pointers. Has to work like a traditional map, so comparsion should be made on the real values and not on the pointers. Oh and can only use the standard lib. –  daralthus Jun 22 '11 at 1:39

2 Answers 2

To answer your literal question from the title: You cannot write a new copy constructor for the existing class template std::map.

Next, are you sure that you really want to implement the entire (binary tree) structure of a map with O(log n) lookup again for your container with the added memory management considerations of a std::shared_ptr (think about objects with custom deleters)? Why not simply put shared_ptrs into your map?

std::map<std::shared_ptr<Key>, std::shared_ptr<Value>>

Update: Could you use Boost's pointer containers? Or do you need your values to be pointers, too? How about a boost::ptr_unordered_map<std::string, T> with values T*?

share|improve this answer
    
It is pretty clear from his code that he is using a std::map internally to do the main work. –  Nicol Bolas Jun 21 '11 at 22:41
    
@Nicole: Sure, and by the looks of it the OP is pretty much trying to treat the key and value members like smart pointers. I'm primarily trying too find out whether between the confused question title and the implementation attempts there's a chance that this could be solved very easily using just standard library constructions. –  Kerrek SB Jun 21 '11 at 22:45

Although I doubt the utility of what you are trying to do, here you go:

auto_map (auto_map& original)
{
    K * kp = 0;
    V * vp = 0;
    try
    {
        for (typename std::map<K*, V*, cmp>::iterator i=original.m.begin();
             i!=original.m.end();
             ++i, kp=0, vp=0)
        {
            kp = new K(*(i->first));
            vp = new V(*(i->second));
            m[kp] = vp;                  
        }
    }
    catch(...)
    {
        delete kp;
        delete vp;

        // write a destroy function that does the same thing
        // as your destructor does now
        destroy();
        throw;       
    }
}
share|improve this answer
5  
This solution slices K and V. If OP wants deep copy semantics for his container, the only solution is to require that K and V be cloneable. –  Lambdageek Jun 21 '11 at 22:27
1  
It's also not exception-safe, for what that's worth. –  Steve Jessop Jun 21 '11 at 22:50

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