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I’ve run into a problem in my validation script to check the Australian postcodes. It doesn’t seem to be incrementing through the multi-dimension array which contains the postcode values.

Here’s the function:

function validateAustralia(postcode, ranges) {

           for (var i = 0; i < ranges.length; i++) {
                     console.log(i);
//returns only 0, when it should return 0, 1, 2.
                     console.log("postcode: " + postcode + " " + "ranges: " + ranges);
//returns postcode: 2000 ranges: 200,299,2600,2618,2900,2920
                     console.log("ranges - low: " + ranges[2][0] + " " + "ranges - high: " + ranges[2][1]);
                     //returns ranges - low: 2900 ranges - high: 2920
                if (postcode >= ranges[i][0] && (postcode <= ranges[i][1])) {
                     valid = true;
                     //confirmation();
                     //break;
                } else {
                     inelegible();
                     return false;
                }
           }
     }

For New South Wales, for example

ranges = [ [1000, 2599], [2619, 2898], [2921, 2999] ];

it’s only returning 1000 and 2599 -- that is ranges[0][0] and ranges[0][1] so someone entering the postcode for Dubbo (which is in New South Wales) is ruled invalid, because its postcode -- 2830 -- isn't between 1000 and 2599.

jQuery's $.each() iterates over the first array correctly, but I'm not sure how to get the values from the second level array.

Edit: OK, so it was a late night, and I'm blind. kojiro has most of the answer below, and a friend here also pointed it out: I'm terminating the iteration after the first run through. I moved that if else loop outside the iteration and just test if the postcode is within range. If is, it's valid. Then, if valid = true I call the confirmation function and everything else is good:

function validateAustralia(postcode, ranges) {
    for (var i = 0; i < ranges.length; i++) {
            console.log(i);
            // returns 0, 1, 2 ...
            console.log("postcode: " + postcode + " " + "ranges: " + ranges);
            // for Dubbo (2830), for example, returns postcode: 2830 ranges: 1000,2599,2619,2898,2921,2999
            console.log("ranges - low: " + ranges[i][0] + " " + "ranges - high: " + ranges[i][1]);
            // returns  ranges - low: 1000 ranges - high: 2599,
            //          ranges - low: 2619 ranges - high: 2898, ...


        if (postcode >= ranges[i][0] && (postcode <= ranges[i][1])) {
            valid = true;
        //  alert("valid =" + valid);
        } 
        if (valid === true) {
            confirmation();
            // all good
        } else {
            inelegible();
            // Sorry, mate
        }
    }
}

Because I'm new here, (long time listener, first time caller) I can't answer my own question, but that's basically it.

Here's the HTML and the calling function for @nnnnnn and anyone else who wants to see: The user chooses their state from a select

<select id="states" name="states">
     <option selected="" value="">Please choose ...</option>
        <optgroup label="Australia" id="australia">
        <option value="act">Australian Capital Territory </option>
        <option value="nsw">New South Wales </option>
      <!-- ...and so on for the rest of the states -->

and inputs their postcode into a textbox

<input id="postcode" name="postcode" type="text" maxlength="4" />

which I get thusly

postcode = $('#postcode').val();

and check against a range of postcode values

function checkAustralia(state, postcode, ranges) {  
    //      has to be in the range of values
        switch (state) {
            //Australian states
            //match the whole postcode
            //postcodes with a leading '0' are validated as whole numbers without the '0'
        case 'act':
            ranges = [ [200, 299], [2600, 2618], [2900, 2920] ];
            validateAustralia(postcode, ranges);
            break;
        case 'nsw':
            ranges = [ [1000, 2599], [2619, 2898], [2921, 2999] ];
            validateAustralia(postcode, ranges);
            break;
// ...and so on for the rest of the states
share|improve this question
    
what happens if you log just ranges? is it what you are expecting? if you only get through one iteration, perhaps ranges isn't well formed? –  thescientist Jun 22 '11 at 0:04
1  
1. Can you post the code that calls your function? You've given an example of NSW ranges, but not exactly how you pass that around. 2. Shouldn't this sort of thing be validated server-side? –  nnnnnn Jun 22 '11 at 0:17
    
Thanks guys, I think I have it covered now. @thescientist it was the return false that stopped the iteration. @nnnnnn 1. for educational purposes I'll post the calling function 2. I'd prefer it to be done on the server side, but that's what we've got to work with :) –  David McK Jun 22 '11 at 0:44

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your function returns false as soon as the first range is checked. Reverse that logic: return true if the value is in the range, but return false only if the loop is entirely exhausted.

Also, your code doesn't always explicitly return a value. That isn't obviously a problem, but it could be related to the confusion here.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks kojiro, that was most of the answer. OK, so it was a late night and I've gone blind :) –  David McK Jun 22 '11 at 0:35
    
@David McK You're welcome. Don't forget to mark the answer as correct if you're satisfied. –  kojiro Jun 22 '11 at 0:38
    
done :) –  David McK Jun 22 '11 at 0:43

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