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Environment: MySql, Rails 3.0.7

In my user table I have a 'last_activity_date' column which is kept up to date using various after_save hooks scattered throughout the app.

I currently have the following named scope:

scope :active, lambda { where('last_activity_date >= ?', 1.month.ago) }

which is used very frequently. It had not seemed worth indexing that column given it's lack of selectivity and because it is updated fairly frequently (daily for some users, very seldom for others).

As the number of users grows, queries using the 'active' scope are taking longer and longer, though. Will indexing the 'last_activity_date' column be worth it in the long run?

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Most probably, yes. Can you provide some of the actual SQL queries that are produced? –  ypercube Jun 22 '11 at 0:07
    
The active user query typically looks like this: SELECT users.* FROM users WHERE (last_activity_date >= '2011-05-22 00:26:52') AND (users.id >= 0) ORDER BY users.id ASC LIMIT 1000 –  Andy Jun 22 '11 at 0:28

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If the queries you have look like your comment:

SELECT users.* 
FROM users
WHERE (last_activity_date >= '2011-05-22 00:26:52')
  AND (users.id >= 0)
ORDER BY users.id ASC
LIMIT 1000

then definitely, yes, the performance of these queries will greatly improve with a simple index on last_activity_date

I guess that users.id is the PRIMARY KEY of the table, so there is already an index on it.


When you don't have an index, the query has to scan the whole users table, to check which rows satisfy the condition last_activity_date >= 1 month ago. With a small numbers of users that goes unnoticable. With thousands (or millions) of users, it will be real slow.

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Thanks. I assume that in the index for last_activity_date the pointers to the actual rows are all stored chronologically so the DB doesn't end up searching through the entire index. Hence, as time elapses, it's always a matter of only looking at 31 entries in the index? –  Andy Jun 22 '11 at 15:56

One rule of thumb says that you should index every column used in a WHERE clause. So I'd index it.

You can tell how selective it is using a query like this.

SELECT last_activity_date, count(*)
FROM users
GROUP BY last_activity_date
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