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A question aboud file permissions when saving a file that when non existent, is created initially as new file.

Now, this all goes well, and the saved file appear to have mode 644.

What to I have to change here, in order to make the files save as mode 777?

Thanks a thousand for any hints, clues or answers. The code that I think is relevant here I have included:

/* write to file */

   self::writeFileContent($path, $value);

/* Write content to file
* @param string $file   Save content to wich file
* @param string $content    String that needs to be written to the file
* @return bool
*/

private function writeFileContent($file, $content){
    $fp = fopen($file, 'w');
    fwrite($fp, $content);
    fclose($fp);
    return true;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Note that 0777 mode is dangerous. See stackoverflow.com/questions/2338641/… – user212218 Jun 22 '11 at 0:54
    
@Phoenix thanks. I guese 0766 will suffice (need to allow for all writing permissions). is that better? – Sam Jun 22 '11 at 1:03
1  
0766 is better; that will prevent arbitrary code execution. Does the file need to be world writable, or will it suffice if only e.g., Apache can write to it? Do you have a set of applications that need to be able to write these files? What if you made them run as the same group and set 0764 mode instead? – user212218 Jun 22 '11 at 1:05
1  
not really, it's the write bit that's dangerous, not the execute :-) I would ask why you think it has to be world-writable. – paxdiablo Jun 22 '11 at 1:06
    
Flying @Phoenix Thanks! Indeed, it needs to be World Writable in this case. Canceling the exetuging bit solves my night-sweat wwwwiiiuieuuewuwuuuwww :) Good point about that group thing. I will check that out and make a final descition. – Sam Jun 22 '11 at 1:06
up vote 10 down vote accepted

chmod?

http://php.net/function.chmod

private function writeFileContent($file, $content){
    $fp = fopen($file, 'w');
    fwrite($fp, $content);
    fclose($fp);
    chmod($file, 0777);  //changed to add the zero
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
4  
Don't use 777, it's a decimal number and nothing like what you want :-) – paxdiablo Jun 22 '11 at 0:50
3  
@paxdiablo thanks! noted and edited – thescientist Jun 22 '11 at 0:52

You just need to manually set the desired permissions with chmod():

private function writeFileContent($file, $content){
    $fp = fopen($file, 'w');
    fwrite($fp, $content);
    fclose($fp);

    // Set perms with chmod()
    chmod($file, 0777);
    return true;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
See my comment to thescientist - the correct mask is 0777 not 777. – paxdiablo Jun 22 '11 at 0:51
1  
@paxdiablo Change made. I spend all day on the unix command line and get used to leaving off the special bits. – Michael Berkowski Jun 22 '11 at 0:55

If you want to change the permissions of an existing file, use chmod (change mode):

$itWorked = chmod ("/yourdir/yourfile", 0777);

If you want all new files to have certain permissions, you need to look into setting your umode. This is a process setting that applies a default modification to standard modes.

It is a subtractive one. By that, I mean a umode of 022 will give you a default permission of 755 (777 - 022 = 755).

But you should think very carefully about both these options. Files created with that mode will be totally unprotected from changes.

share|improve this answer
1  
0755. Not 755. – PreferenceBean Jun 27 '11 at 0:12

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