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Please check the two code snippets below. While in sample two, there clearly resides dangling reference issue as ref of local variable is passed, do you think the same problem exists in sample 1? I myself think sample 1 is correct. While data was pushed in data structure (stl::queue), the ref was taken (function header of enqueue: void enqueue(const int &data)). So there should not be problem while returning data through &data here. Is not it?

Sample 1:

int const& dequeue()
{
    _mutex.lock();
    int &data = _queue.back();
    _queue.pop();
    _mutex.unlock();

    return data;
}

Sample 2:

int const& dequeue()
{
    _mutex.lock();
    int data = _queue.back();
    _queue.pop();
    _mutex.unlock();

    return data;
} 
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1  
Sample 2 is definitely broken, you return a temporary by reference. For Sample 1 please clarify, does pop() remove the item you got via back()? In that case data would also become an invalid reference. –  Kerrek SB Jun 22 '11 at 1:20
    
@Kerrek, I don't think that's the point of the question, but some clarification would still be nice - if the question was asked because the code doesn't work, that may be why. –  Dominic Gurto Jun 22 '11 at 1:27
1  
I checked the documentation: pop() removes the oldest element which is accessed with front(). So if your queue has only one element, then you end up with an invalid reference. Otherwise you end up with a reference of undetermined fate; other threads may be popping your queue until it becomes invalid. –  Kerrek SB Jun 22 '11 at 2:07
    
stl::queue.pop() removes the item. –  Faisal Jun 22 '11 at 5:46
    
Kerrek's point is that you're assigning back element, while popping front element. E.g. q={1,2}; i=q.back(), q.pop() then q=={2}, i==2 –  Alexander Malakhov Jun 23 '11 at 1:48

1 Answer 1

Sample 1 is incorrect.

Your reference will become invalid once you call pop().

The reference the function will return must be to an object that is still valid when the function terminates.

This also means that Sample 2 is incorrect, but not for the reason you think. Yes, returning that reference is invalid (it shouldn't even compile), but data is invalid before the end of the function - again, right after the pop() call, any references you have to objects in that container become invalid.

Is there any reason you are returning by reference? You obviously don't expect the value to change at all, and your reference is const, so why not just return by value?

int dequeue()
{
    _mutex.lock();
    int data = _queue.back();
    _queue.pop();
    _mutex.unlock();

    return data;
}

In answer to your more general question, about returning a locally-declared reference, that's fine, as long as the object to which it refers will still be valid once the function terminates. For example:

int glob;

int& f(){
  int x;
  int& ref = glob;
  return x;
}

int main(){
  foo()=10;  //this is fine
}
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Your example is fine, but don't references to members of containers become invalid if you modify the container appropriately? E.g. set<int> v{2,7,5,12}; int & a = *v.begin(); v.clear(); -- now writing to a is bad, non? –  Kerrek SB Jun 22 '11 at 1:37
    
Well of course, but that would invalidate any iterator - there's nothing special about the fact that a is a reference. int& a = *v.begin(); vector<int>::iterator b = v.begin(); v.clear(); - writing to a is bad, but writing to b is equally bad. –  Dominic Gurto Jun 22 '11 at 1:45
1  
@Dominic: But what has a got to do with any iterators? I've dereferenced begin(), so I get a reference to some element in the container. In a vector I could have written int & a = v[3]; same idea (just that in a vector the memory would probably still have been valid after clear()). a is just an int-reference. Isn't that the same situation with the queue? (Assuming back() returns a reference.) –  Kerrek SB Jun 22 '11 at 1:51
    
Oh, I see what you mean. Yes - I'd say pop() invalidates any iterators and references. And back() does return a reference. –  Dominic Gurto Jun 22 '11 at 1:57
1  
@Faisal: Pointers will give exaxtly the same problem as references. Any direct reference to an element (including a pointer) could become invalid due to the modification. Basically, if your function modifies the container, and you want to return an element of the container, returning by value is the only safe option. –  Dominic Gurto Jun 22 '11 at 15:35

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