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I have a vector filled with some vertex object instances and need to sort it, according to its 'x' and after it its 'y' coordinate.

vertex.h

#ifndef VERTEX_H
#define VERTEX_H 1

class Vertex
{
private:
  double __x;
  double __y;
public:
  Vertex(const double x, const double y);
  bool operator<(const Vertex &b) const;
  double x(void);
  double y(void);
};

#endif // VERTEX_H

vertex.cpp

#include "vertex.h"

Vertex::Vertex(const double x, const double y) : __x(x), __y(y)
{
}

bool Vertex::operator<(const Vertex &b) const
{
  return __x < b.x() || (__x == b.x() && __y < b.y());
}

double Vertex::x(void)
{
  return __x;
}

double Vertex::y(void)
{
  return __y;
}

run.cpp

#include <algorithm>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <vector>

#include "vertex.h"

void prnt(std::vector<Vertex *> list)
{
  for(size_t i = 0; i < list.size(); i++)
    printf("Vertex (x: %.2lf y: %.2lf)\n", list[i]->x(), list[i]->y());
}

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{
  std::vector<Vertex *> list;
  list.push_back(new Vertex(0, 0));
  list.push_back(new Vertex(-3, 0.3));
  list.push_back(new Vertex(-3, -0.1));
  list.push_back(new Vertex(3.3, 0));

  printf("Original:\n");
  prnt(list);

  printf("Sorted:\n");
  std::sort(list.begin(), list.end());

  prnt(list);

  return 0;
}

What I expect as output is:

Original:
Vertex (x: 0.00 y: 0.00)
Vertex (x: -3.00 y: 0.30)
Vertex (x: -3.00 y: -0.10)
Vertex (x: 3.30 y: 0.00)
Sorted:
Vertex (x: -3.00 y: -0.10)
Vertex (x: -3.00 y: 0.30)
Vertex (x: 0.00 y: 0.00)
Vertex (x: 3.30 y: 0.00)

But what I actually get is:

Original:
Vertex (x: 0.00 y: 0.00)
Vertex (x: -3.00 y: 0.30)
Vertex (x: -3.00 y: -0.10)
Vertex (x: 3.30 y: 0.00)
Sorted:
Vertex (x: 0.00 y: 0.00)
Vertex (x: -3.00 y: -0.10)
Vertex (x: -3.00 y: 0.30)
Vertex (x: 3.30 y: 0.00)

I don't know what exactly is going wrong, any idea?

share|improve this question
    
How does that compile? Your operate< takes a const &Vertex but there is no double Vertex::x() const? – Chris Jun 22 '11 at 2:54
1  
read this: stackoverflow.com/questions/228783/… – Loki Astari Jun 22 '11 at 2:56
    
Allow me to welcome you to StackOverflow and remind three things we usually do here: 1) As you receive help, try to give it too answering questions in your area of expertise 2) Read the FAQs 3) When you see good Q&A, vote them up by using the gray triangles, as the credibility of the system is based on the reputation that users gain by sharing their knowledge. Also remember to accept the answer that better solves your problem, if any, by pressing the checkmark sign – Dr. belisarius Jun 22 '11 at 3:05
up vote 6 down vote accepted

You are storing Vertex * in the container not Vertex. When you call std::sort, you're actually sorting the value of the pointers, not the items themselves.

If you really need to be storing pointers (which I doubt), you can use a workaround like this (untested):

struct less_than_key {
    inline bool operator() (const Vertex*& v1, const Vertex*& v2) {
        return ((*v1) < (*v2));
    }
};
std::sort(list.begin(), list.end(), less_than_key());
share|improve this answer
    
That's it, thanks – Wanderson Jun 22 '11 at 2:59
    
@Wanderson so how did you fix the problem? you changed std::vector<Vertex *> to std::vector<Vertex> or sth else? – shengy Jun 22 '11 at 3:05
    
Added an edit to fix it without changing pointer to non-pointer. I didn't try compiling, so if I made any mistakes, let me know so I can edit. – jterrace Jun 22 '11 at 3:10

If you want to save yourself writing all those classes yourself (and violating the double-underscore rule!), you could consider just using a

std::vector< std::pair<float, float> >

and using std::sort. Pairs are by default lexicographically compared (which is what you asked for), so you don't need any extra code.

share|improve this answer
    
I know I can use std::pair, but it is a simplified version of Vertex class, the complete one has methods for angle, distance and other calculations I need. And about the double-underscore rule, I'll make sure to apply it in my future codes. – Wanderson Jun 22 '11 at 3:26
    
@Wanderson: Fair enough. If you can't get away with free functions for those conversions and calculations, then you'll have to make your own class (though it could well have the pair-vector as its main data member and expose its comparison operator). – Kerrek SB Jun 22 '11 at 3:30

You are sorting pointers, not the actual Vertex objects. Try this:

std::vector<Vertex> list;
list.push_back(Vertex(0, 0);
list.push_back(Vertex(-3, 0.3);
...

I.e. get rid of the pointer in the list container and the new's in the calls to push_back.

share|improve this answer

Seems like you want to sort be abolute values for some reason:
Try this:

bool Vertex::operator<(const Vertex &b) const
{
  return std::abs(__x) < std::abs(b.__x) || (std::abs(__x) == std::abs(b.__x) && std::abs(__y) < std::abs::(b.__y));
}

Note: you do not need to call b.x() to get the member of another object when you are the same class. You can just access the other member.

Note: Don't use double underscore in your identifiers. Prefer not to prefix identifiers with underscore.

share|improve this answer
    
Actually I need the leftmost vertex in the beginning of the list. Then, it can't be the absolute value. – Wanderson Jun 22 '11 at 3:27

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