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Is there a better (nicer/more efficient) way to do this?

return View(db.Things
    .Where(t => t.DateTimeObj.Month == DateTime.Today.Month 
        && t.DateTimeObj.Day == DateTime.Today.Day)
    .OrderByDescending(e => e.DateTimeObj)
    .Take(num)
);

The following do not work (no Date object in LINQ to Entites).

Todays records:

return View(db.Things
    .Where(t => t.DateTimeObj.Date == DateTime.Today)
    .OrderByDescending(e => e.DateTimeObj)
    .Take(num)
);

Last 24 hours records:

return View(db.Things
    .Where(t => t.DateTimeObj > DateTime.Today.AddHours(-24))
    .OrderByDescending(e => e.DateTimeObj)
    .Take(num)
);

Edit:

This seems to do the trick:

return View(db.Things
    .Where(t => t.DateTimeObj > SqlFunctions.DateAdd("dd", -1, DateTime.Now))
    .OrderByDescending(e => e.DateTimeObj)
    .Take(num)
);

Possible gotchas as pointed out by Chris Sainty:

  1. SQL Server only (probably?)
  2. Date computations are held off to be performed by SQL Server, as oposed to supplying a pre computed date in the linq2sql translation.
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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Take a look at the SqlFunctions class on msdn which provides access to the sql datediff etc functions.

Note they can not be used to run the code in C# they are just placeholders that the query parser understands and can convert to T-SQL. Obviously this is SQL Server only unless other providers have wrapped these functions.

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Sweet, that looks to be doing it just fine. It would be interesting to know if there is any significant performance impact to running the datediff in sql server as oposed to the clr. –  Kyle Jun 24 '11 at 3:13
    
Should be much better in sql as it can take advantage of indexes and only bring back the required records over the wire. To filter dates clr side you need to bring them all down first. –  Chris Sainty Jun 24 '11 at 3:23
    
Good point on the indexes, but what do you mean by pull them all down first? Surely the dates are worked out and pushed into a sql query as 'static' strings, giving the db the chance to do the filtering...? –  Kyle Jun 24 '11 at 3:30
    
If you have a datetime variable in the query, then yes it is sent to the server. You can't always know the date in advance though (if it is calculated from the record for example) and what some people do is add a .ToList() into the query above the date filtering which brings all the records to the client unfiltered and then filters client side with LINQ-to-Objects. I find the SqlFunctions class is not well known about. It was this second case I was referring to. –  Chris Sainty Jun 24 '11 at 3:48
    
Ahh, I see what you're on about. Wires crossed in this case re what happens when with the query generation. I'm grateful that most things in the linq world tend to happen in a logical/consistent way. –  Kyle Jun 24 '11 at 5:02
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Simply declare your 'compare to' dates before hand

var today = DateTime.Today;
return View(db.Things
    .Where(t => t.DateTimeObj.Date == today)
    .OrderByDescending(e => e.DateTimeObj)
    .Take(num)
);

//Last 24 hours records:
var yesterday = DateTime.Now.AddDays(-1);
return View(db.Things
    .Where(t => t.DateTimeObj > yesterday)
    .OrderByDescending(e => e.DateTimeObj)
    .Take(num)
);
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Workable & correct. I was hoping I could avoid this and keep it all inside the lambda def. If we can't get a more succinct solution this will be it. Thanks. –  Kyle Jun 24 '11 at 2:56
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