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Well it is a basic question but I seem confused enough.

#include<stdio.h>
int main()
{
char a[100];
printf("Enter a string\n");
scanf("%s",a);
}

Basically the above is what I want to achieve. If I enter a string

James Bond

then I want that to be stored in array a. But the problem is because of presence of a blank space in between only James word is stored. So how can I solve this one.

UPDATE
After the replies given below I understand fgets() would be a better choice. I want to know internal working of fgets as why is it able to store the string with space where as scanf is not able to do the same.

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3  
Use fgets instead of scanf. Almost always. –  Chris Lutz Jun 22 '11 at 7:28
    
@Chris Lutz I want to know how does fgets works why is fgets able to accept space but not scanf? –  Registered User Jun 22 '11 at 7:33
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5 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Is this what you need?

All implementations scans the input file(or stream) until it reaches \n or EOF, or the maxSize param is hit...

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yes man that is exactly what I wanted.Thanks.Let me know what keywords you had used to get that. –  Registered User Jun 22 '11 at 17:01
    
google.ro/… –  Quamis Jun 23 '11 at 10:16
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scanf reads up until the first whitespace character. The solution is to use fgets, if memory serves me correctly, in your instance it'd be:

fgets(a, 100, STDIN);

It will read up to 100 characters (or the first \n) from standard input and store it in a.

Do not use the gets function ever, even if it looks easier.

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@Lainlwakura I want to know how does fgets works why is fgets able to accept space but not scanf and why should one not use gets()? –  Registered User Jun 22 '11 at 7:34
1  
I don't know the internals of fgets(), but you should not use gets() because it only takes a pointer to the array. It has absolutely no knowledge of how large the array is and indeed you can overflow it very easily. Some compilers, such as gcc, will actually warn you about using the gets() function –  LainIwakura Jun 22 '11 at 7:36
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Usually scanf breaks the input at whitespace (space, tab, newline, ...).

For example, the input " 5 42 -100" is accepted with scanf("%d%d%d") because each %d strips the leading whitespace. The same behaviour happens with %s.

The only conversion specifiers where the ignoring of leading whitespace doesn't happen are %%, %[ and %c (and, for different reasons, %n)

char input[] = " hello world";
char buf[100];
sscanf(input, "%8c", buf); /* buf contains " hello w" */
sscanf(input, "%8[^o]", buf); /* buf contains " hell" */

The fgets function reads as many characters as there are, up to the nest line break.


I use The Open Group Base Specifications Issue 7 for online documentation

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You should use gets(a)/fgets(a, sizeof(a), stdin) instead of sscanf().

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I want to know internal working of fgets as why is it able to store the string with space where as scanf is not able to do the same. –  Registered User Jun 22 '11 at 7:40
    
@registered-user see cplusplus.com/reference/clibrary/cstdio/sscanf . %s for sscanf work with word. (until a whitespace is found) –  mattn Jun 22 '11 at 7:42
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Try fgets():

char a[100];
printf("Enter a string\n");
fgets(a, sizeof(a), STDIN);

To learn more about STDIN, check this.

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I want to know how does fgets works i.e. how is fgets able to store the complete string with white space also. –  Registered User Jun 22 '11 at 7:32
    
@Registered User: please check the link. –  Donotalo Jun 22 '11 at 7:33
    
I read your link it talks about stdin whose file descriptor is 0 but I am not able to get how fgets does it. –  Registered User Jun 22 '11 at 7:42
    
@Registered User, you can check your compiler implementation of scanf() and fgets(). –  Donotalo Jun 22 '11 at 7:48
    
@Registered User, I've never looked into the implementation so I don't know about them. :) –  Donotalo Jun 22 '11 at 7:49
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