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I am someone who has some c++ background and tries to use object oriented programming / classes in matlab.

Can anybody explain me in simple terms what the difference between a handle and a value class is?

I know that I would use a value class if I wanted to define a matrix class with overloaded operators such as "+" and "*". However, sometimes it seems that things only work for me as I want when I pick a handle class.

Thanks in advance for the help!

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3 Answers 3

up vote 11 down vote accepted

The MathWorks provide some information on which to be used for which purpose in their help and also in their PDF documentation. I've also found this article from the Yagtom Project (originally by Matt Dunham) to be a great introduction to OOP in MATLAB.

In the help this is explained as follows:

MATLAB support two kinds of classes — handle classes and value classes. The kind of class you use depends on the desired behavior of the class instances and what features you want to use.

Use a handle class when you want to create a reference to the data contained in an object of the class, and do not want copies of the object to make copies of the object data. For example, use a handle class to implement an object that contains information for a phone book entry. Multiple application programs can access a particular phone book entry, but there can be only one set of underlying data.

The reference behavior of handles enables these classes to support features like events, listeners, and dynamic properties.

Use value classes to represent entities that do not need to be unique, like numeric values. For example, use a value class to implement a polynomial data type. You can copy

In the article by Matt Dunham, another good point is made to distinguish both types of classes:

We previously mentioned that objects in Matlab are, (by default) passed by value, meaning that full copies are passed back and forth in method calls. Matlab graphics objects, however, are passed by reference, (via handles). If we subclass the built in handle class [...] then objects of our class will be passed by reference too, not value.

I personally tend to use handle classes to get some of the syntax I'm used to with Java: for a handle class, you can have the object store all information, such that you can have operations like sort(a) (or a.sort()) be performed in place, with value classes the equivalent of this is a = sort(a) (or a = a.sort()). For operators the first syntax makes no sense at all, but the second is obviously in general use: e.g. a = a + b (this is equivalent to a = plus(a,b) and a = a.plus(b)).

If the main concern of your class is to store (numeric) values of some kind and to be able to perform operations, the value class is most likely the way to go. If you want to store a state, group related values, connect different objects together (linked lists, graphs, ...), the handle class might be the way to go. Or at least, that's what I tend to use to make the distinction.

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It's actually quite simple, and different than the languages you note. Handle classes get passed by reference. Value classes pass by value. The difference from c/c++ is that mechanism is part of the type system, not an operation that can be performed on any variable.

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I think it is roughly like C++ stack vs. heap difference (in my opinion it is a good approximation also if many people think otherwise).

Applied to MATLAB:

  • handle object lives in heap
  • value object is allocated on in the stack

with handle you have a bonus class: hgsetget which has very nice get/set syntax for properties like used for ui, hence hg which means handle graphics.

To critics and C++ experts:

Please calm down, I think that the point of this discussion are NOT subtle details which are always different but rough correlation. Or do you mean that heap and handle classes are orthogonal concepts? And yes, MATLAB has automatic memory management.

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And if you actually understand C++, then you should know the difference between "stack vs heap" and "automatic vs dynamic storage duration". And you should know about "static storage duration". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 11:11
    
So, a value object that is a member of a handle object is allocated where? Are you sure handle vs value is about memory location? If so, why aren't they named simply "stack object" and "heap object"? –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 22 '11 at 11:34
    
See Egon's answer. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 12:05
    
I see which analogy you are trying to make, but I think it is too far removed from the average MATLAB developer to make any sense. Your analogy lies in the subtle details. What is actually the case, is that both are what they say they are: handles and values. Perform an operation to a handle, and all handles that point to the same data will reflect that. Change a value and only that value will change. Similarly with the differences in assignment: you pass along a handle or the actual value. –  Egon Jan 29 '12 at 10:25
    
@Egon: OP says explicitly that he has some c++ background and now tries to understand MATLAB. –  Mikhail Jan 29 '12 at 19:43
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