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If I have a time string of the form

"Wed, 22 Jun 2011 09:43:58 +0200"

coming from a client I wish to store it with the time zone preserved. This is important because it's not just the absolute UTC time that is important but the timezone.

Time.zone.parse t

will convert the time to whatever the zone that Time.zone is using at the time losing the source timezone.

Do I have to manually extract the timezone from the above string or is there an idiomatic way to do this?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

A DateTime field can only store 'YYYY-MM-DD HH:MM:SS' (MySQL), no Time Zone info.

You should store the datetime in UTC, and the Timezone in a different field, preferably as an integer specifying the offset from UTC in minutes.

You can extract the offset like this:

ruby-1.9.2-p180:001:0>> require 'active_support/all' # included by Rails by default
# => true
ruby-1.9.2-p180:002:0>> dt = DateTime.parse "Wed, 22 Jun 2011 09:43:58 +0200"
# => Wed, 22 Jun 2011 09:43:58 +0200
ruby-1.9.2-p180:003:0>> dt.utc_offset
# => 7200
ruby-1.9.2-p180:004:0>> dt.utc
# => Wed, 22 Jun 2011 07:43:58 +0000

EDIT:

And to round trip the excercise

ruby-1.9.2-p180 :039 > u.utc.new_offset(u.offset)
=> Wed, 22 Jun 2011 09:43:58 +0500 
ruby-1.9.2-p180 :040 > u
=> Wed, 22 Jun 2011 09:43:58 +0500 
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Thanks for that. And how to reassemble the original string from the two components? Then I'm set. –  bradgonesurfing Jun 22 '11 at 8:38
    
I cannot seem to find a reasonable way to do it. dt2 = DateTime.parse "Wed, 22 Jun 2011 07:43:58 +0000"; dt2 += 7200.seconds; could work for your case. –  Dogbert Jun 22 '11 at 8:45
    
dt2.change(:offset => Rational(7200, 86400)) if you also want to change the offset in the DateTime object. –  Dogbert Jun 22 '11 at 8:46
    
It would be better to store the actual name of the timezone, and not a offset in minutes from UTC. That way it is obvious what the original time zone was, and the UTC time can be converted to the then-current-utc-minute-offset. A case in point is Pulaski county. Yes, this is a rare occurrence, but it costs really nothing to store the actual time zone. –  Zabba Jun 22 '11 at 9:28
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I think you are looking for the following solution:

In ApplicationController:

before_filter :get_tz

def get_tz
  @tz = current_user.time_zone
end

def use_tz
  Time.use_zone @tz do
    yield
  end
end

And in a controller add around filter at the beginnig

around_filter :use_tz
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