Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have one simple question about throwing exeptions in re.match function

Is there a way to 'match' function threw an exception? Maybe some flag. If this is not possible maybe there is some other function in RE library which throw an exception when the list will be empty for example.

Example:

verify_link=re.match(".*"+str(country).lower()+"."+str(city).lower()+".*",link)

This example in some cases returns None

I am looking for a method that would throw Exception, not None I can do this by 'if' statement, but mayby there is any other way

share|improve this question
    
.​.​. W​h​a​t​? –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 22 '11 at 9:05
    
could you explain what you are trying to do? –  Fredrik Pihl Jun 22 '11 at 9:06
    
I updated post, sorry for poor description, i wrote it in a hurry –  falek.marcin Jun 22 '11 at 9:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There is no such function(s) in Python re module. See the doc:

exception re.error

Exception raised when a string passed to one of the functions here is not a valid regular expression (for example, it might contain unmatched parentheses) or when some other error occurs during compilation or matching. It is never an error if a string contains no match for a pattern.

share|improve this answer
if re.match(".*"+str(country).lower()+"."+str(city).lower()+".*", link) is None:
    raise Exception('whatever')
share|improve this answer

Erm? Exceptions should happen only in exceptional situation, not the one you are describing. But, if you have to, you can always check return value using if and then raise exception.

Edit: and even make own function, to hide the exception throwing...

share|improve this answer

If you want to throw exception??? so you can use index string method, for example:

verify_link = link.index(str(country).lower()+"."+str(city).lower())

EDITED: You should take into account that '.' will match dot only in my example above.

But i think that this is not the best way to check that sub-string is within string.

share|improve this answer
    
. will not have the same meaning here as in a regex. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jun 22 '11 at 9:23
    
Oh yes, sure, you are right –  Artsiom Rudzenka Jun 22 '11 at 9:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.