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I have implemented a naive evaluator of some functions. I have just entered the world of f#, so it will ask you there exists (and if yes, how to implement) a faster evaluator. I have to get a data structure that contains (variableName, (condition + newVariableName)). These two fields are strings. Below is a part of my version of the evaluator:

let env = new Dictionary<_,_>(HashIdentity.Structural)
//eval: expr -> Prop
let rec eval = function
//Val of string -- is a variable name or a string value
| Val e -> if e.Equals("TRUE") then True       // True is a Prop type used for BDD Algorithm
           elif e.Equals("FALSE") then False   // False is a Prop type used for BDD Algorithm
           else var e    //var of string --- is a Prop type used for BDD Algorithm
| Int i -> var (i.ToString())
| Float e -> var (e.ToString()) 
| Const c -> var c //Const of string --- is a constant name (ex. "$foo" is a constant)
| Path (e, s) -> var ((eval e).ToString() + "." + s)
| Lookup(s, el) -> var s
| Integer(ex) -> eval ex 
| FromTo (e, el) ->var ((eval e).ToString() + (eval el.Head).ToString() + (eval el.Tail.Head).ToString())
| Str(e) -> eval e
| Equality (v, e) -> let evalV = eval  v
                     let evalE = eval  e
                     match evalE with
                     | Var e -> 
                            let sndKey = "Equality" + evalE.ToString()
                            if env.ContainsKey (evalV.ToString()) then 
                                if env.[(evalV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                                    var env.[(evalV.ToString())]
                                else ~~~ (var env.[(evalV.ToString())]) 
                            else
                                env.Add((evalV.ToString()), (evalV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                                var ((evalV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                     | _ as k -> if bddBuilder.Equiv k False then
                                    let sndKey = "Equality" + "False"
                                    if env.ContainsKey (evalV.ToString()) then 
                                         if env.[(evalV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                                             var env.[(evalV.ToString())]
                                         else ~~~ (var env.[(evalV.ToString())]) 
                                    else
                                        env.Add((evalV.ToString()), (evalV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                                        var ((evalV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                                 else let sndKey = "Equality" + "True"
                                      if env.ContainsKey (evalV.ToString()) then 
                                          if env.[(evalV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                                                var env.[(evalV.ToString())]
                                          else ~~~ (var env.[(evalV.ToString())]) 
                                      else
                                          env.Add((evalV.ToString()), (evalV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                                          var ((evalV.ToString()) + sndKey)
| Inequality (v, e) -> let evaluatedV = (eval  v).ToString()
                       let evaluatedE = (eval  e).ToString()
                       let sndKey = "Inequality" + evaluatedE
                       if env.ContainsKey (evaluatedV.ToString()) then 
                            if env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                                   var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]
                            else ~~~ (var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]) 
                       else env.Add((evaluatedV.ToString()), (evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                            var ((evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
| IfThenElse (e1, e2, e3) -> (eval e1 &&& eval e2) ||| ((~~~ (eval e1)) &&& eval e3)
| FindString(e1, e2) -> var ("FS" + (eval e1).ToString() + (eval e2).ToString())
| GreaterThan(e1, e2) -> let evaluatedV = (eval  e1).ToString()
                         let evaluatedE = (eval  e2).ToString()
                         let sndKey = "GreaterThan" + evaluatedE
                         if env.ContainsKey (evaluatedV.ToString()) then 
                             if env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                                    var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]
                             else ~~~ (var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]) 
                         else env.Add((evaluatedV.ToString()), (evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                              var ((evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
| GreaterThanOrEqual(e1, e2) -> let evaluatedV = (eval  e1).ToString()
                                let evaluatedE = (eval  e2).ToString()
                                let sndKey = "GreaterThanOrEqual" + evaluatedE
                                if env.ContainsKey (evaluatedV.ToString()) then 
                                    if env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                                        var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]
                                    else ~~~ (var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]) 
                                else env.Add((evaluatedV.ToString()), (evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                                     var ((evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
| Null(e) -> var ("Null" + (eval e).ToString())
| GetToken(e1, e2, e3) -> var ((eval e1).ToString() + (eval e2).ToString())
| Mod(e1, e2) -> var ((eval e1).ToString() + (eval e2).ToString())
| Match(e1, e2) -> let evaluatedV = (eval  e1).ToString()
                   let evaluatedE = (eval  e2).ToString()
                   let sndKey = "Match" + evaluatedE
                   if env.ContainsKey (evaluatedV.ToString()) then 
                        if env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                               var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]
                        else ~~~ (var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]) 
                   else env.Add((evaluatedV.ToString()), (evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                        var ((evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
| LessThenOrEqual(e1, e2) -> let evaluatedV = (eval  e1).ToString()
                             let evaluatedE = (eval  e2).ToString()
                             let sndKey = "LessThen" + evaluatedE
                             if env.ContainsKey (evaluatedV.ToString()) then 
                                if env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                                    var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]
                                else ~~~ (var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]) 
                             else env.Add((evaluatedV.ToString()), (evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                                  var ((evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
| LessThen(e1, e2) -> let evaluatedV = (eval  e1).ToString()
                      let evaluatedE = (eval  e2).ToString()
                      let sndKey = "LessThen" + evaluatedE
                      if env.ContainsKey (evaluatedV.ToString()) then 
                            if env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())].Equals(sndKey) then
                                   var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]
                            else ~~~ (var env.[(evaluatedV.ToString())]) 
                      else env.Add((evaluatedV.ToString()), (evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
                           var ((evaluatedV.ToString()) + sndKey)
| Length(e) -> var ("Len" + (eval e).ToString())
| Full(e) -> var ("Full" + (eval e).ToString())
| Minus(e1, e2) -> var ((eval e1).ToString() + (eval e2).ToString())
| Times(e1, e2) -> var ((eval e1).ToString() + (eval e2).ToString())
| Plus (e1, e2) -> var ((eval e1).ToString() + (eval e2).ToString())
| Duration(e) -> eval e
| Minutes(e) -> eval e
| Trim(e) -> var ("Tri" + (eval e).ToString())
| Reverse(e) -> var ("Rev" + (eval e).ToString())
| Ast.And (v1, v2) -> eval v1 &&& eval v2
| Ast.Or (v1, v2) -> eval v1 ||| eval v2
| Ast.Not(v1) -> ~~~ (eval v1)
| _ as a-> failwithf "Expression %A not found" a

Edit: This evaluator is used to verify boolean condition. In this version there is only one Dictionary and it is more performant, but how can I model situations such as the following:

  1. var1 == "foo1" && var1=="foo2" ---> satisfiable: false
  2. var2>=0 && var2>0 ---> satisfiable: true
  3. (var3 == "foo2" && var3 != null) || var3 == "foo1" --> satisfiable: true
share|improve this question
    
Can you paste your data structure for the expressions ? –  Ankur Jun 22 '11 at 11:27
    
Also, it isn't quite clear what exactly is your question... –  Tomas Petricek Jun 22 '11 at 11:42
    
@Tomas - As far as I understood the question, it is related to the strategies for evaluating expressions. In the question the code is using Dictionaries and there will be other ways to evaluate expressions without using these dictionaries –  Ankur Jun 22 '11 at 12:10
    
@Ankur @Tomas- The question is: there is a better way than I have created to evaluate some expression? The data structure for the expression is big (is a Discriminated Union). –  marcx87 Jun 22 '11 at 12:18
    
@marcx87: I have tweaked your English in the question, I hope you don't mind. It would help enormously if you could provide a complete working program, even if it is a cut down version of the real thing, because it is impossible to talk about the performance of code that cannot be run with any real conviction. –  Jon Harrop Jun 25 '11 at 15:00

2 Answers 2

The answer is: it depends.

It some scenarios it may be best to naively walk the tree evaluating as you go. This will probably be the best strategy when your expressions are small and evaluated once, or only a few times.

If you’re expressions are large and maybe evaluated maybe times it maybe be best to try and do some optimization. Any optimization will have an associated cost that will need to be amortized, so this is why it is best to target large expression that will need to be executed several times. There are many types of optimization you could try, here are a few suggestions (a good compilers text book would no doubt have many more and better suggestions):

  • Walk you’re tree looking for cases that could be executed in advance. For example if two constants are adjacent you may be able to perform the operation (i.e. add them together) and produce a new smaller simpler tree. Similarly if you find anything that is multiplied by a zero constant, then you maybe replace this simply by zero, as anything multiplied by zero is zero.
  • You could walk your trees looking for branches that are exactly equivalent, if this branch has no side effects, you may be able to cache its result and only execute it once (this could even be done between different expressions if necessary).
  • You may want to look at compiling your data structure. In .NET you can use the Relection.Emit namespace, or generate code via the CodeDom to generate code that is the equivalent of your data structure. This will speed up execution enormously, but the compilation will have a very high cost, so it a strategy to be used carefully.

Any optimizations you implement should be carefully measured against the ‘naïve’ baseline, in some cases your optimization may not behave as expected and could result in a slower execution.

Anything other that quite simple optimizations will probably be quite tricky to implement, so good luck!

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. The are many and large expression...I thought that there were ways to write F# code that enhance the performance. –  marcx87 Jun 22 '11 at 16:30

Perhaps the simplest optimization to your code that is likely to yield a significant gain is replacing your use of the (horrid) F# extension method for searching a Dictionary with the .NET alternative that does not allocate. So this:

match env.TryGetValue evaluatedV with
| true, v1 ->
    match v1.TryGetValue sndKey with
    | true, v2 -> v2
    | _ ->
        v1.[sndKey] <- evaluetedV + sndKey
        env.[evaluatedV] <- v1
        evaluatedV + sndKey
| _ ->
    if value.Count <> 0 then value.Clear()
    value.[sndKey] <- evaluetedV + sndKey
    env.[evaluatedV] <- value
    evaluatedV + sndKey

becomes:

let mutable v1 = Unchecked.defaultof<_>
if env.TryGetValue(evaluatedV, &v1) then
  let mutable v2 = Unchecked.defaultof<_>
  if v1.TryGetValue(sndKey, &v2) then v2 else
    v1.[sndKey] <- evaluetedV + sndKey
    env.[evaluatedV] <- v1
    evaluatedV + sndKey
else
  if value.Count <> 0 then value.Clear()
  value.[sndKey] <- evaluetedV + sndKey
  env.[evaluatedV] <- value
  evaluatedV + sndKey

However, those hash table lookups are probably killing your performance. There are a variety of techniques that can evade such problems but they are not F# specific:

  • Coalesce your two hash table lookups into a single hash table lookup.
  • Replace the strings with a more efficient type, such as hash consed symbols.
  • Replace the external hash table with mutable references in each symbol giving the result of looking that symbol up in the value or env dictionaries.
share|improve this answer
    
I wanted to use a symbolic programming (as I thought it was more efficient). But I'm not very practical in this type of programming. Your version seems more compact, but I somehow doubt that it is more efficient. On the Web indicates that I used as the most efficient solution (though really bad to see). –  marcx87 Jun 26 '11 at 7:45
    
@marcx87: The TryGetValue you used allocates on the heap whereas the one I used does not so I would expect it to be significantly faster. Without working code, it is impossible to make statements about performance with any certainty. We need a complete working benchmark! –  Jon Harrop Jun 26 '11 at 8:28
    
I try it now! –  marcx87 Jun 26 '11 at 8:57

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