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What are the iterator invalidation rules for C++ containers?

Preferably in a summary list format.

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4 Answers 4

C++03 (Source: Iterator Invalidation Rules (C++03))


Insertion

Sequence containers

  • vector: all iterators and references before the point of insertion are unaffected, unless the new container size is greater than the previous capacity (in which case all iterators and references are invalidated) [23.2.4.3/1]
  • deque: all iterators and references are invalidated, unless the inserted member is at an end (front or back) of the deque (in which case all iterators are invalidated, but references to elements are unaffected) [23.2.1.3/1]
  • list: all iterators and references unaffected [23.2.2.3/1]

Associative containers

  • [multi]{set,map}: all iterators and references unaffected [23.1.2/8]

Container adaptors

  • stack: inherited from underlying container
  • queue: inherited from underlying container
  • priority_queue: inherited from underlying container

Erasure

Sequence containers

  • vector: every iterator and reference after the point of erase is invalidated [23.2.4.3/3]
  • deque: all iterators and references are invalidated, unless the erased members are at an end (front or back) of the deque (in which case only iterators and references to the erased members are invalidated) [23.2.1.3/4]
  • list: only the iterators and references to the erased element is invalidated [23.2.2.3/3]

Associative containers

  • [multi]{set,map}: only iterators and references to the erased elements are invalidated [23.1.2/8]

Container adaptors

  • stack: inherited from underlying container
  • queue: inherited from underlying container
  • priority_queue: inherited from underlying container

Resizing

  • vector: as per insert/erase [23.2.4.2/6]
  • deque: as per insert/erase [23.2.1.2/1]
  • list: as per insert/erase [23.2.2.2/1]

Note 1

Unless otherwise specified (either explicitly or by defining a function in terms of other functions), invoking a container member function or passing a container as an argument to a library function shall not invalidate iterators to, or change the values of, objects within that container. [23.1/11]

Note 2

It's not clear in C++2003 whether "end" iterators are subject to the above rules; you should assume, anyway, that they are (as this is the case in practice).

Note 3

The rules for invalidation of pointers are the sames as the rules for invalidation of references.

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2  
Good idea, just to remark: I think that the associative containers could be folded together in a single line, and it could be worth then adding another line of the unordered associative ones... though I am not sure how the rehashing part could be mapped on insert/erase, do you know of a way to check whether a rehash will be triggered or not ? –  Matthieu M. Jun 22 '11 at 10:33
    
@Matthieu: There's certainly scope here for a bit of C++0x magic. The associative containers were originally semi-folded together, but Martinho changed that and I don't entirely disagree with him. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 10:52
    
I changed it because the way it was originally (with '' meaning "same as above") it looked a bit weird and confusing. I didn't think of placing them in a single line :( @Matthieu: Unless the containers provide a means to check it, there's no way to know if a rehash will happen. –  R. Martinho Fernandes Jun 22 '11 at 11:12
    
I prefer to see the rules itemised by container. That's the point of this FAQ entry. I don't want prose bundled together. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 11:22
1  
IIRC, somewhere the spec says that the end iterator is not an iterator "to objects within that container". I wonder how those guarantees look for the end iterator in each case? –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jun 22 '11 at 12:57
up vote 105 down vote accepted

C++11 (Source: Iterator Invalidation Rules (C++0x))


Insertion

Sequence containers

  • vector: all iterators and references before the point of insertion are unaffected, unless the new container size is greater than the previous capacity (in which case all iterators and references are invalidated) [23.3.6.5/1]
  • deque: all iterators and references are invalidated, unless the inserted member is at an end (front or back) of the deque (in which case all iterators are invalidated, but references to elements are unaffected) [23.3.3.4/1]
  • list: all iterators and references unaffected [23.3.5.4/1]
  • forward_list: all iterators and references unaffected (applies to insert_after) [23.3.4.5/1]
  • array: (n/a)

Associative containers

  • [multi]{set,map}: all iterators and references unaffected [23.2.4/9]

Unsorted associative containers

  • unordered_[multi]{set,map}: all iterators invalidated when rehashing occurs, but references unaffected [23.2.5/8]. Rehashing does not occur if the insertion does not cause the container's size to exceed z * B where z is the maximum load factor and B the current number of buckets. [23.2.5/14]

Container adaptors

  • stack: inherited from underlying container
  • queue: inherited from underlying container
  • priority_queue: inherited from underlying container

Erasure

Sequence containers

  • vector: every iterator and reference after the point of erase is invalidated [23.3.6.5/3]
  • deque: erasing the last element invalidates only iterators and references to the erased elements and the past-the-end iterator; erasing the first element invalidates only iterators and references to the erased elements; erasing any other elements invalidates all iterators and references (including the past-the-end iterator) [23.3.3.4/4]
  • list: only the iterators and references to the erased element is invalidated [23.3.5.4/3]
  • forward_list: only the iterators and references to the erased element is invalidated (applies to erase_after) [23.3.4.5/1]
  • array: (n/a)

Associative containers

  • [multi]{set,map}: only iterators and references to the erased elements are invalidated [23.2.4/9]

Unordered associative containers

  • unordered_[multi]{set,map}: only iterators and references to the erased elements are invalidated [23.2.5/13]

Container adaptors

  • stack: inherited from underlying container
  • queue: inherited from underlying container
  • priority_queue: inherited from underlying container

Resizing

  • vector: as per insert/erase [23.3.6.5/12]
  • deque: as per insert/erase [23.3.3.3/3]
  • list: as per insert/erase [23.3.5.3/1]
  • forward_list: as per insert/erase [23.3.4.5/25]
  • array: (n/a)

Note 1

Unless otherwise specified (either explicitly or by defining a function in terms of other functions), invoking a container member function or passing a container as an argument to a library function shall not invalidate iterators to, or change the values of, objects within that container. [23.2.1/11]

Note 2

no swap() function invalidates any references, pointers, or iterators referring to the elements of the containers being swapped. [ Note: The end() iterator does not refer to any element, so it may be invalidated. —end note ] [23.2.1/10]

Note 3

Other than the above caveat regarding swap(), it's not clear whether "end" iterators are subject to the above listed per-container rules; you should assume, anyway, that they are.

Note 4

vector and all unordered associative containers support reserve(n) which guarantees that no automatic resizing will occur at least until the size of the container grows to n. Caution should be taken with unordered associative containers because a future proposal will allow the specification of a minimum load factor, which would allow rehashing to occur on insert after enough erase operations reduce the container size below the minimum; the guarantee should be considered potentially void after an erase.

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+1 found via your blog. On the downvote, dare we guess, people who didn't see the difference (c++0x/c++03) and hand-reflex-voted for duplicate answer? –  sehe Nov 14 '11 at 14:32
    
Beside swap(), what's the rules for iterator validity upon copy/move assignment? –  goodbyeera Mar 8 at 2:35
    
@goodbyeera: Copy/move assignment of what? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 at 11:11
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit: Like insertion, erasure, resizing and swap, copy/move assignment are also member functions of std::vector, so I think you could provide the rules of iterator validity for them too. –  goodbyeera Mar 8 at 11:17
    
@goodbyeera: You mean copy/move assigning an element? This will not affect any iterators. Why would it? You're hitting Note 1 above. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Mar 8 at 11:22

It is probably worth adding that an insert iterator of any kind (std::back_insert_iterator, std::front_insert_iterator, std::insert_iterator) is guaranteed to remain valid as long as all insertions are performed through this iterator and no other iterator-invalidating event occurs.

For example, when you are performing a series of insertion operations into a std::vector by using std::insert_iterator it is quite possible that the vector will experience a reallocation event, which will invalidate all iterators that "point" into that vector. However, the insert iterator in question is guaranteed to remain valid, i.e. you can safely continue the sequence of insertions. There's no need to worry about triggering vector reallocation at all.

This, again, applies only to insertions performed through the insert iterator itself. If iterator-invalidating event is triggered by some independent action on the container, then the insert iterator becomes invalidated as well in accordance with the general rules.

For example, this code

std::vector<int> v(10);
std::vector<int>::iterator it = v.begin() + 5;
std::insert_iterator<std::vector<int> > it_ins(v, it);

for (unsigned n = 20; n > 0; --n)
  *it_ins++ = rand();

is guaranteed to perform a valid sequence of insertions into the vector, even if the vector "decides" to reallocate somewhere in the middle of this process.

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Since this question draws so many votes and kind of becomes an FAQ, I guess it would be better to write a separate answer to mention one significant difference between C++03 and C++11 regarding the impact of std::vector's insertion operation on the validity of iterators and references with respect to reserve() and capacity(), which the most upvoted answer failed to notice.

C++ 03:

Reallocation invalidates all the references, pointers, and iterators referring to the elements in the sequence. It is guaranteed that no reallocation takes place during insertions that happen after a call to reserve() until the time when an insertion would make the size of the vector greater than the size specified in the most recent call to reserve().

C++11:

Reallocation invalidates all the references, pointers, and iterators referring to the elements in the sequence. It is guaranteed that no reallocation takes place during insertions that happen after a call to reserve() until the time when an insertion would make the size of the vector greater than the value of capacity().

So in C++03, it is not "unless the new container size is greater than the previous capacity (in which case all iterators and references are invalidated)" as mentioned in the other answer, instead, it should be "greater than the size specified in the most recent call to reserve()". This is one thing that C++03 differs from C++11. In C++03, once an insert() causes the size of the vector to reach the value specified in the previous reserve() call (which could well be smaller than the current capacity() since a reserve() could result a bigger capacity() than asked for), any subsequent insert() could cause reallocation and invalidate all the iterators and references. In C++11, this won't happen and you can always trust capacity() to know with certainty that the next reallocation won't take place before the size overpasses capacity().

In conclusion, if you are working with a C++03 vector and you want to make sure a reallocation won't happen when you perform insertion, it's the value of the argument you previously passed to reserve() that you should check the size against, not the return value of a call to capacity(), otherwise you may get yourself surprised at a "premature" reallocation.

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1  
However, I'd shoot any compiler who did this to me, and no jury in the land would convict me. –  Yakk May 2 at 14:39

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