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I want to read two text files, and handle them at same time just as follow:

f1 = File.open(...)
f2 = File.open(...)

|f1, f2|.each do |l1,l2|
    ......
end

How can i do this in Ruby?

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Do you mean you want to step through and have equivalent lines from each file at the same time? Or something else? –  Gareth Jun 22 '11 at 11:14
    
Your question is somewhat underdefined: Are the files the same number of lines? What should happen if they're not? –  Telemachus Jun 22 '11 at 12:17
1  
Why would anyone vote to close this question? It's not the world's most exciting, revolutionary question ever, but it's a perfectly legitimate question to have (albeit a little unclear - see my previous comment). –  Telemachus Jun 22 '11 at 12:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 6 down vote accepted

How to avoid the memory suck associated with matt's answer:

f1 = File.open(...)
f2 = File.open(...)

f1.each.zip(f2.each).each do |line1, line2|
  # Do something with the lines
end

zip is one of the many less-known methods in Enumerable that are well worth knowing, especially if you're interested in learning the functional programming paradigm.

It avoids the memory suck associated with matt's answer because rather than reading everything in, f1.each returns an enumerator which you can use only as you need it.

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2  
+1 for three uses of each in one compact expression. One issue worth mentioning: if one or the other file runs out of lines early (so to speak - if it's shorter), then the resulting zipped sub-arrays will be full of nils that must be tested for or dealt with somehow. This problem appears however you handle this issue, but I figured it was worth saying. –  Telemachus Jun 22 '11 at 12:33
1  
@Telemachus: Worse still, if the first file runs out of lines early, then it'll finish without letting you know the other one still has lines. –  Andrew Grimm Jun 23 '11 at 2:11
    
+1 for using Enumerable#zip –  hdgarrood Mar 13 '13 at 10:18
f1 = File.open(...)
f2 = File.open(...)

f1.each do |l1|
  l2 = f2.gets.chomp
  ......
end
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A naive approach, assuming the files are the same number of lines. This is completely manual, but the idea should give you something to build on:

f1 = File.open('foo.txt', 'r')
f2 = File.open('bar.txt', 'r')

while line1 = f1.gets && line2 = f2.gets
  print "File 1: #{line1}"
  print "File 2: #{line2}"
end

This would stop as soon as either of the two files ran out of lines (if one is shorter than the other). This may or may not be what you want, obviously.

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Is this something that would work for you? :

File.readlines(file1).each do |line_of_file1|
  File.readlines(file2).each do |line_of_file2|
    # Do stuff with the lines
  end
end
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3  
If there was n lines in file1, and m lines in file2, there'd be n * m loops. –  Andrew Grimm Jun 22 '11 at 11:30
lines1 = File.open(...).readlines
lines2 = File.open(...).readlines

lines1.zip(lines2).each do |line1, line2|
  ...
end
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1  
Depending on the size of the files readlines can potentially become a memory suck. Not saying this is never appropriate, but something to keep in mind. –  Telemachus Jun 22 '11 at 12:16

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