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I have singleton class which is shared in several threads. To prevent multiple access issues I use Lock method when accessing one or another property of the class. The question would be is it possible to improve code and put Lock method inside singleton class rather than putting it every time when the class property is accessed in code?

/* Class code*/
   public class ServerStatus
    {


        private static ServerStatus _instance;
        public static ServerStatus Instance
        {
            get { return _instance ?? (_instance = new ServerStatus()); }
            set { _instance = value; }
        }

        ServerStatus()
        {
            PistonCount = 0;
            PistonQueue = new List<string>();
            ErrorList = new List<string>();
        }




        public int PistonCount { get; set; }

        public List<string> PistonQueue { get; set; }

        public List<string> ErrorList { get; set; }
    }



 /*Code for accessing class properties*/
private static readonly object Locker = new object();    
/*Skip*/

lock (Locker)
{
 ServerStatus.Instance.PistonQueue.Add(e.FullPath);
}
    /*Skip*/

lock (Locker)
{
    ServerStatus.Instance.PistonCount++;
}
share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

ServerStatus should maintain its own synchronization, not external clients of this class. That being said, you'll need to refactor ServerStatus and create a few thread-safe (with locking) methods:

Remove these properties: public List<string> PistonQueue { get; set; } since even though you can lock inside these properties, you can't control what clients do once they get a hold of the actual PistonQueue.

...and replace with methods such as (sorry pseudo-code, I can't be bothered to think today):

public PistonQueueAdd(string fullPath)
{
    lock(_serverStatusSyncRoot)
    {
        // ...
    }
}
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+1 This is what I also finally suggested to him, but you described it better! –  Dummy01 Jun 22 '11 at 13:02

This is the singleton thread-safe pattern I use in case you are interested:

    public class DataAccess
{
    #region Singleton

    private static readonly object m_SyncRoot = new Object();

    private static volatile DataAccess m_SingleInstance;

    public static DataAccess Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if (m_SingleInstance == null)
            {
                lock (m_SyncRoot)
                {
                    if (m_SingleInstance == null)
                        m_SingleInstance = new DataAccess();
                }
            }

            return m_SingleInstance;
        }
    }

    private DataAccess()
    {
    }

    #endregion
}
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If this is actively in use, first thing is to remove the horrid m_ prefixes. –  Grant Thomas Jun 22 '11 at 12:29
1  
Your answer do not answer my question. I ask how to reduce Lock methods in code and put Lock inside class to lock properties. –  Tomas Jun 22 '11 at 12:35
3  
@ Mr.Disappointment Very important note you did there! Congratulations! Now back to the question and its answers, do you have something useful to suggest to the person that asked the question? –  Dummy01 Jun 22 '11 at 12:36
1  
+1 This is the definitive Singleton thread-safe initializer, see this MSDN page for reference, you have to use volatile and you have to use a lock on the getter, you can't reduce this any further. –  Chris O Jun 22 '11 at 12:39
2  
I think what you asked is a matter of what your class is doing. If you can do some methods that maintain the class properties all together, then just do the lock there, and leave your get properties simple. But if this is not what you want then I am sorry but I cannot see any other solution than lock in the properties code. –  Dummy01 Jun 22 '11 at 12:55

IMHO, this is the definitive solution for thread-safe locking in a singleton. From it (fifth on the list):

public sealed class Singleton
{
    private Singleton()
    {
    }

    public static Singleton Instance { get { return Nested.instance; } }

    private class Nested
    {
        // Explicit static constructor to tell C# compiler
        // not to mark type as beforefieldinit
        static Nested()
        {
        }

        internal static readonly Singleton instance = new Singleton();
    }
}
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+1 I saw this solution for a while a go, and was looking for to post as answer. This is best solution I guess, no locks and doesn't create instance until you need it –  ArsenMkrt Jun 22 '11 at 12:35
    
Your answer do not answer my question. I ask how to reduce Lock methods in code and put Lock inside class to lock properties. You show how to lock new instance initialization. –  Tomas Jun 22 '11 at 12:37
    
@Tomas: If the property is set up this way you don't require explicit locks. That's kind of the whole point. –  Yuck Jun 22 '11 at 12:39
    
Hmm interesting, I will test it and let you know. –  Tomas Jun 22 '11 at 12:41
1  
@Yuck: You're misreading the question. Locks are still needed when adding to the list or incrementing the counter. –  LukeH Jun 22 '11 at 12:42

This is fairly common. Locking/unlocking in the getters/setters is much safer, (you cannot forget to do it), and more convenient, (the lock does not have to be directly accessable everywhere you use the property), than an external lock on every property access.

Rgds, Martin

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True, however, from the link I posted: "Unfortunately, performance suffers as a lock is acquired every time the instance is requested." –  Yuck Jun 22 '11 at 12:33
    
...and by the way I didn't downvote you. I actually don't think what you wrote deserves a downvote. –  Yuck Jun 22 '11 at 12:35
    
Also, I wouldn't say this is best practice - locks should be acquired with minimality, both in execution terms and that of scope - having to acquire and release a lock in every property of a class you want to make thread-safe is inefficient and harder to maintain. –  Grant Thomas Jun 22 '11 at 12:35
    
Well, perhaps I sould have qualified my answer with 'depends on what the setters/getters do'. If they're merely setting/getting member data, the time spent inside the lock would be very small & the possibility of contention likewise. The problem with an extended locking policy on individual property read/write is that this often turns into an extended deadlocking policy. The more locks, and the more complex the lock strategy, the more difficult it is to prevent problems, especially with ongoing development: every time you add/change internal functionality, you have to revisit the locking:( –  Martin James Jun 22 '11 at 12:59

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