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Here is an example:

class A
  class << self
    p superclass
  end
end

a = A.new

class << a
  p superclass
end

This code print:

#<Class:Object>
A

Why instead of

Class 
A

print line

#<Class:Object>
A

?

For an anonymous class

  class << self
    p superclass
  end

superclass is Class

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Please note that a metaclass, which can contain singleton methods, is not quite the same as an anonymous class, which is defined using Class.new do # .. –  Kudu Jun 22 '11 at 15:10

1 Answer 1

I am not 100% sure if I understand the question correctly. Please rephrase it or provide more details in case I misunderstood it.

A call to superclass returns an object, which in this case is Class. In Ruby everything is an object. To my knowledge this is correct behaviour.

If you want to see the name of the class only, call p superclass.name.

Edit A call to superclass can return nil. When you do: class << a, you are extending a with new methods (take a look at this reading about classes, objects and modules). Since a is an Object (an instance of class A), it has no superclass - Object is the top of hierarchy tree. Class A has a superclass (class named Class), but not the instance of A it.

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<code>p superclass.name</code> in class A print nil. Code <code>class << a p superclass.name end</code> print "A". Why nil? –  user413881 Jun 22 '11 at 13:10

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