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Regarding this question on iterator invalidation rules, it seems obvious that the spirit of the standard means, for example, that "an erase in the middle of the deque invalidates all the iterators and references to elements of the deque" also refers to the end iterator.

However, I can't find anywhere that the standard makes this explicit, and strictly speaking the end iterator is not an iterator to an element in the container.

Does the 2003 standard make this clear somewhere?

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For example, 23.1/10: no swap() function invalidates any references, pointers, or iterators referring to the elements of the containers being swapped. [ Note: The end() iterator does not refer to any element, so it may be invalidated. —end note ] ... I do not know if we can be certain that iterator referring to an element has been used consistently in the Standard to exclude end iterators :/ –  Matthieu M. Jun 22 '11 at 13:22
    
@Matthieu: Indeed >.< –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 13:24
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I don't have the 2003 standard to hand, but C++0x seems to be clear on this, e.g. "An erase operation that erases the last element of a deque invalidates only the past-the-end iterator and all iterators and references to the erased elements." (emphasis mine). –  Mike Seymour Jun 22 '11 at 13:35
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@MarkRansom: Of course. That's not what this question is about, though. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 14:34
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@Johannes: I suppose if the end iterator points to a sentinel value within the container, then the end iterators after the swap won't point to the sentinel in the "right" container, thus any sequence [it, end) would be ill-formed as end would not be reachable from it. –  Matthieu M. Jun 22 '11 at 18:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

For example, 23.1/10:

no swap() function invalidates any references, pointers, or iterators referring to the elements of the containers being swapped. [ Note: The end() iterator does not refer to any element, so it may be invalidated. —end note ]

I do not know if we can be certain that iterator referring to an element has been used consistently in the Standard to exclude end iterators :/

As said in a comment, I suppose this is to allow end iterators pointing to sentinel values within the container.

For example, a typical doubly linked List implementation is to create a Node structure, and have one Node by value within the List to act as the end node.

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I'm satisfied, through this answer and through the relevant comments, that C++03 is ambiguous in this matter. Of course, in practice, we know that we should treat past-the-end iterators in the same manner as iterators to container elements; however, this answer is the answer to this question. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 23:27

Since the end iterator is not a pointer to an element it seemed obvious to me that it wasn't invalidated. It explicitly states that.

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No, it doesn't. What it doesn't do is explicitly state that the iterator is invalidated. But it doesn't state that it's not, either. (And note that, in practice, it usually is.) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 14:27
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It says "invalidates all the iterators and references TO ELEMENTS". Since the end iterator is not a reference to AN ELEMENT then it's not invalidated. Seems pretty clear. –  Jay Jun 22 '11 at 18:03
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Wrong. It is not a boolean. The opposite of "definitely invalidated" is absolutely not "definitely not invalidated". There is scope for "the standard doesn't say whether the iterator is invalidated or not"; indeed, that seems to be the case here. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 22 '11 at 23:25

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