Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Running Postgres 7.4 (yeah we are upgrading) and I have a table where we are merging three fields into a new field if the field has value.

Example Data:

record_id | old_field_1 | old_field_2 | old_field_3 | new_field
+---------+-------------+-------------+-------------+----------+
12345     | blah        | foo         |             |            <-- new_field = foo
12346     |             |             | what        |            <-- new_field = what
12347     |             |             |             |            <-- new_field IS NULL
12348     | hello       |             |             |            <-- new_field = hello

So this works below for one record:

UPDATE db_table
SET new_field = CASE 
    WHEN old_field_3 IS NOT NULL THEN old_field_3
    WHEN old_field_2 IS NOT NULL THEN old_field_2
    WHEN old_field_1 IS NOT NULL THEN old_field_1
    ELSE new_field
END
WHERE record_id = 123456

And the next record would be

UPDATE db_table
SET new_field = CASE 
    WHEN old_field_3 IS NOT NULL THEN old_field_3
    WHEN old_field_2 IS NOT NULL THEN old_field_2
    WHEN old_field_1 IS NOT NULL THEN old_field_1
    ELSE new_field
END
WHERE record_id = 123457

old_field_# (1,2,3) are all different values. If old_field_3 IS NOT NULL use this value for the new_field, else check the next value. But each record has it's own unique value that needs to be updated

But I wanted to iterate over all the records in the database.

Trying a FOR loop but the syntax or proper usage I'm not implementing correctly. Just trying to get the SELECT working before trying to do the UPDATE syntax but having some issues.

FOR a_record IN SELECT * FROM db_table LOOP
    RAISE NOTICE 'record_id - %', a_record.record_id;
    RAISE NOTICE 'old_field_1     - %', a_record.old_field_1; 
END LOOP;

What am I missing?

share|improve this question
    
It's not what you're missing, it's what you've got that you don't need. The WHERE clause restricts the UPDATE to just records where record_id = 123456, so remove the WHERE clause and it will apply to all records? – MatBailie Jun 22 '11 at 14:34
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If i understand you correctly, if you want to do that combination for all records in a table, simply remove your where clause from your query.

share|improve this answer
    
so if I remove the where clause then all the record would have the same new_field value, but I would like to update the new_field based on the case statement for each record – Phill Pafford Jun 22 '11 at 14:34
    
If you remove the where clause, it will always look at the columns for that specifc row. so for record 123456 it will use its specific old_field columns to create the new one. Same would happen for record 1 or record 5000. the record will ALWAYS reference itself. – Limey Jun 22 '11 at 14:38
    
crap! I didn't know if executing the UPDATE statement would do this for each record individually but just take the first case value and update all the records with that. Much thanks for the clarification and help – Phill Pafford Jun 22 '11 at 14:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.