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This Assembly code:

cmp [Variable1], 10
jae AlternateBlock
call SomeFunction
jmp AfterIfBlock
cmp [Variable1], 345
jne AfterIfBlock
call SomeOtherFunction

equals to this C code?:

if (variable1 >= 10)
{
    goto AlternateBlock;
    SomeFunction();
    goto AfterIfBlock;
}
else if (Variable1 != 345)
{
    goto AfterIfBlock;
    SomeOtherFunction();
}
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3 Answers 3

More succinctly:

if( variable1 < 10 ) {
  SomeFunction();
} else if( variable1 == 345 ) {
  SomeOtherFunction()
}

Explanation:

cmp [Variable1], 10
jae AlternateBlock     ; if variable1 is >= 10 then go to alternate block
call SomeFunction      ; else fall through and call SomeFunction(). ie. when variable1 < 10
jmp AfterIfBlock       ; prevent falling through to next conditional
cmp [Variable1], 345
jne AfterIfBlock       ; if variable1 is not equal to 345 then jump to afterifblock
call SomeOtherFunction ; else fall through to call SomeOtherFunction

If you take some time to understand it you should see it's semantically equivalent to the C code. Perhaps this helps.

cmp [Variable1], 10
jb @f
call SomeFunction
jmp end
  @@:
cmp [Variable1], 345
jnz end
call SomeOtherFunction
  end:
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Thank you very much. –  Thanos Papas Jun 22 '11 at 19:00

No, it's probably more like this:

if (variable1 < 10)
    SomeFunction();
else if (Variable1 == 345)
    SomeOtherFunction();

But you've not included the labels in your assembler so I can't be sure. I've assumed the labels are like this:

    cmp [Variable1], 10
    jae AlternateBlock
    call SomeFunction
    jmp AfterIfBlock
@@AlternateBlock:
    cmp [Variable1], 345
    jne AfterIfBlock
    call SomeOtherFunction
@@AfterIfBlock:
share|improve this answer
    
I think you have the second one wrong. –  Mike Kwan Jun 22 '11 at 14:35
    
@Mike Yes I've just spotted that when checking through again. Thanks. –  David Heffernan Jun 22 '11 at 14:35

No, it's not. If variable1 is less than 10, the assembly code will call SomeFunction, and the C code will not, it will jump to AlternateBlock

share|improve this answer
    
But why is it; if variable1 < 10, jae isn't jump if above or equal? –  Thanos Papas Jun 22 '11 at 14:34
    
@Thanos: Yes, so bacause variable is less than 10, it will NOT jump anywhere and will go to the next statement, which is call someFunction –  Armen Tsirunyan Jun 22 '11 at 14:35
    
I mean that JAE isn't if (>=)? –  Thanos Papas Jun 22 '11 at 14:38
    
@Thanos JAE is indeed jump if greater than or equals. Think about it! –  David Heffernan Jun 22 '11 at 14:39
    
Oh yes, now I understood, I have been stuck for a moment, thank you. –  Thanos Papas Jun 22 '11 at 14:40

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